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Golf

  • TEE TIME: All courses don’t need to be bears

    Harold Filiatreau may have been ahead of his time.

    Or when he designed Cedar-Fil Golf Course 50 years ago, he had the ingredients for a golf course that attracted golfers to his facility that has been tossed to the wayside by today’s architects in a way that has hurt the game.

    Surveys indicate that golf is losing players because the game takes too long to play and can be too expensive.

    In many instances, it’s just not fun.

  • TEE TIME: Try this fun survey

    Golf.com recently surveyed more than 1,000 golfers late last year on various topics about the game.

    The respondents represented low and high handicappers, men and women, and members of private clubs and greens fee players.

    I found some of the answers to be quite interesting.

    Take a look at some of the topics and see how you would answer. I am listing mine for the world to see.

    • Would you like to play more golf than you do?

    Yes — 61.9 percent

    No — 38.1 percent

  • TEE TIME: Leave the course better than you found it

    I’m really looking forward to playing golf this Friday.

    It’s not that I’m going to be playing a very exclusive course, but rather, I will be joining some childhood friends and cousins for a casual round of golf at Maywood.

    As you would expect, most of them are more accomplished players than me.

    Stephen George, the former St. Joe and St. Xavier player, is the youngest player to ever win the Lebanon Invitational Tournament, defeating Bubba Clements in the finals at the tender age of 16.

  • GOLF: Cedar-Fil marks 50 years

    Cedar-Fil Golf Course could be described as Nelson County’s blue-collar facility for area golfers.

    When you pull into the entrance on KY 245, the site of an extravagant clubhouse will not bedazzle you. Instead, there is a modest building that more than serves its purpose.

    As you check in and pay your bargain-priced greens fee, you don’t have to inquire about your tee time because they are not required.

  • TEE TIME: Stretching, exercising can help buffer effects of aging

    It’s hell to get old, but as they say, it sure beats the alternative.

    I just turned 63, but in the past six months, I’ve discovered more aches and pains than ever before.

    And to make matters worse, it has started to affect my golf game, and that can’t be good.

    I first noticed it during my first few rounds of the year on the nine-hole course at the Lebanon Country Club.

  • TEE TIME: Lesson learned … maybe?

     

    I should have known better.

    Actually, I did know better.

    Why would I doubt how serious Augusta National would be in certifying the media lists for any events held on their grounds?

    And, yep, I got caught, though I wasn’t really trying to beat the system.

    Well, maybe a little.

  • TEE TIME: Catching up with golf

    Here we go again.

    And as the Cowsills sang in their 1969 platinum-selling song Hair (which obviously doesn’t apply to me), “Don’t ask him why, cause he don’t know.”

    Best I can figure, the powers that be of this paper, knowing that the summer months are upon us and there will be a desperate need for sports copy to fill these pages, are once again accepting my weekly diatribes to take up space.

    Don’t ask me why.

    And you’re going to have to put up with it for what, the fourth or fifth year?

  • GOLF: Coyle gets youth win, trip to Augusta

    The grandson of a Bardstown man is heading to Augusta National.

    Luke Coyle, the grandson of Terry Coyle and the late Mona Lisa Coyle, qualified for the finals in the Drive, Chip and Putt contest by winning the regional meet at Oakmont Golf Club and thus will be on the hallowed grounds on the Sunday preceding The Masters.

    The Campbellsville boy is one of the top golfers in the state in the 11/12-year-old age division.

    Madison Borders of Bardstown participated in the event at Oakmont but did not advance.

     

  • GOLF: Boone’s Butcher Shop League continues to thrive

    Mondays typically are the slowest day of the week at most golf courses.

    Many private clubs are closed; others will have workers diligently working to get the course back into shape after a busy weekend; and golfers will take the day off after perhaps playing back-to-back rounds on Saturday and Sunday.

    But venture to out to My Old Kentucky Home Golf Course on any Monday during the golf season and you’ll quickly notice that this isn’t a typical day.

  • ‘Runnin’ for Randy’

    Prior to firing the gun, participants in Monday’s Labor Day 5K/10K event bowed their heads and closed their eyes in prayer.

    “We gather on behalf of our friend Randy, whose body is not going the way that it is supposed to go,” said Nelson County High School track and cross country coach Dan Bradley, leading the prayer from atop a ladder.

    The event is something NCHS started hosting five years ago as a way to support the team and students. Over the years, guests of honor have received recognition at the race, but this year was different.