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Opinion

  • You have several chances in the near future to make Nelson County a more attractive place to live, work and play. One will even allow you to rid your house of potentially harmful chemicals.

    On Saturday all Nelson County residents can take household hazardous waste to the landfill at no charge 8 a.m.-2 p.m. The landfill is at 1025 Airport Rd., Bardstown, about 3.5 miles from the city limits off Boston Road. The collection is for local residences only, not businesses. Identification will be required showing a Nelson County address.

  • To the editor:

  • To the editor:

    As Election Day draws nearer I feel compelled to do something I have never done before, to write a letter to the editor in support of a candidate. The man I support is Bill Sheckles for Mayor of Bardstown. Bill’s qualifications and accomplishments put him head and shoulders above others vying for the position.

    Bill has served Bardstown for the past 12 years as city councilman; this has given him a great insight of the inner workings of city government and what needs to be done to make Bardstown an even better place to live and raise our families.

  • To the editor:

    Recently, I moved back to Kentucky after nine years in Atlanta, Georgia.  While I was eager to get back in the embrace of family and the small-town culture, the toughest aspects were connecting with the people and working through the pace.  Mayoral candidate Bill Sheckles encouraged my participation in the community of Bardstown through volunteering at events and even taking high school students to Frankfort to learn about the processes of state officials.  

  • In a mid-term election cycle full of up-for-grabs seats, scandals and old video tapes, much of the discussion has centered around the bruising battle for control of congress between Democrats and Republicans.

    Like always, the two parties are each promising that electing the other can only spell certain doom for this country and asking voters to pick sides. However, I’m quickly getting to the point where I feel like neither party represents me.

  • To the editor:

    I was shocked, amazed and embarrassed when I read the article about the State Police investigating Jon Ryan for allegedly trying to incite a riot at the Nelson County Jail.

  • To the editor:

    Let me start by saying all my life I have been a staunch Democrat as my father and his father before him, but when my son and I (we are disabled, my son is a vet —100 disabled) contacted Dean Watts about bow hunting on county land, we were told if we didn’t like the way he ran his county — not our county, his — we should pack up and go back from where we came Yankees.

    Well, Mr. Watts, you ran my son off but I’m here to stay and all my family and I are voting for Tim Hutchins.

  • To the editor:

  • To the editor:

    I keep reading of the problem facing gays and the military. I have a suggestion: Interview the crew of a submarine.

    Emmett R. Barnes

    404 N. Third St.

    Bardstown

  • Voting on Nov. 2? Doesn’t really matter if you do or don’t, someone is going to win whether you are there or not. So if you are really not interested in being a part of this process, then you can stop reading this editorial and skip on back to the comics and Dear Abby.

  • When Kentucky passed its law banning texting while driving for all drivers, it took a more restrictive step for Kentucky teens.

    In addition to banning texting, under the new law drivers under 18 are restricted from using a phone in any capacity except in an emergency situation. The simple fact is, teen drivers are still learning the ins and outs of driving and the rules of the road. Taking away the distraction of a cell phone allows teen drivers to concentrate more on acquiring better skills and less on what is being said or written over a phone.

  • To the editor:

  • To the editor:

    The Tea Party phenomena is an attempt being made by loyal citizens to help steer a confused nation back to its founding principles — God as our Creator, and we as His creatures.

    Today this confusion is known as political correctness, and thank God, it is being contested.

    This confusion comes about when the profane is substituted for the citizenry.

    The most glaring of course is the word “Pro-Choice.” This is the word that has been substituted and accepted for nothing other than pre-meditated murder.

  • To the editor:

    Peter Trzop seems to be running for office on his military record, and that alone. Everything you read that he has put out, or when he’s at a debate, is always about his military record.

    He is a disabled veteran, yet no one knows how he became disabled. It seems he hasn’t explained this. I would like to know what his disability is if he could tell us because he hasn’t done it so far. Was he wounded? If not, what? Or is this a John Kerry moment?

    John Post

    300 St. Gregory Church Road

    Cox’s Creek

  • To the editor:

  • I should be embarrassed. I should feel ashamed that it has taken me so long to accomplish this one goal.

    But I’m not and I don’t. I’m nearly giddy with excitement. On Wednesday I received a Nelson County Public Library card.

    It sounds silly even as I write it, that I would get so excited about a simple little thing. It’s free and nearly anyone can receive one. But it does take the effort to go to the library, fill out a small form, show your ID and wait for your card. That’s the part I was negligent in doing.

  • To the editor:

  • To the editor:

  • OK, I want to make sure I understand. Two years ago, with the nation facing a host of complex and difficult problems, voters put a bunch of thoughtful, well-educated people in charge of the government. Now many of those same voters, unhappy and impatient, have decided that things will get better if some crazy, ignorant people are running the show? Seriously?

  • Before last weekend’s Bardstown Arts, Crafts and Antiques Fair, the St. James Court Art Show in Old Louisville was my hometown annual arts event. St. James is huge, with about 750 exhibitors throughout North America. It draws 300,000 visitors during one weekend to several blocks of the historic Victorian neighborhood.

    And for this reason, it sometimes feels it’s lost its local feel.