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Opinion

  • I would hate to be on a jury.

    A lot of people try to avoid jury duty because of the inconvenience, either personal or economic. But for me, I would want to avoid making the decision over guilt or innocence in a criminal trial.

    That’s because lawyers, typically, are good at what they do. That makes a juror’s duty hard.

  • The broad definition of volunteering is offering to do work for no compensation. But people tend to volunteer for organizations that have some personal meaning to them that gives them fulfillment.

    However, volunteers are crucial to the success of many different organizations and charities. Volunteers are necessary, and many organizations depend on them.

    Volunteering is not only about the impacts we can make in the lives of those less fortunate, but also the role it can play in the global community.

  • Sometimes you’ve got to keep getting faster just to stay in place.

    That seems to be the rule with internet speeds, especially.

    Bardstown Internet plans to bring speeds that are 10 times faster than its current highest residential tier in the Springhill area.

    The pilot program will bring download speeds up to 1 gigabit per second, the city-owned utility said recently.

    The city has not announced a price structure yet, but if its current pricing tiers are any indication, it should be some of the most affordable available anywhere.

  • Did anyone bite you at work today?

    On average, nearly 15 mail carriers per day will say, “Yes.”

    Postal Service officials report that last year, 5,714 letter carriers experienced dog bites or dog attacks. With deliveries every day, including Sundays and holidays, carriers continue to experience dog bites in urban, suburban and rural settings.

    Dog attacks and bites are 100 percent preventable when deg owners remain vigilant and properly restrain their dogs.

  • MICHAEL QUIGLEY

    Community Columnist, dr.michael.quigley@gmail.com

  • Chad McCoy

    State Representative, chad.mccoy@lrc.ky.gov

    In the final hours of the last day to veto legislation, the governor rejected an agreement that provided financial relief for quasigovernmental agencies — including local health departments, mental health agencies, and rape crisis centers — and our regional universities participating in the Kentucky Retirement Systems.

  •  Bob Higdon

    Community Columnist, bobhigdon2@gmail.com

  • DAVID SHAMS

    Community Columnist

    “America counts millions of Muslims amongst our citizens and Muslims make an incredibly valuable contribution to our country...and they need to be treated with respect.”

    That’s not a comment pulled from a speech made by U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar or her colleague U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib or even former President Barack Obama. No, that was a comment made by President George W. Bush just six days after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

  • This is not an editorial comment regarding politics, because what happened last week wasn’t political at all. But if you’re the coach of the University of Louisville women’s basketball team, you may feel like politics had something to do with what happened.

  • COLUMBUS, Ohio — “I think it’s all about the dignity of work,” says Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown in an interview in the backseat of his Chevy Suburban. “I talk about how we value work. People who get up every day and work hard and do what we expect of them should be able to get ahead. I don’t think they hear that enough from Republicans or national Democrats.”

  • WASHINGTON — One measure of the effectiveness of a political movement is how it changes its opposition. And Donald Trump is in the process of driving portions of his Democratic opposition insane.

    Hillary Clinton — whose warmth, integrity and down-to-earth style were the largest reasons for Trump’s election — has now publicly turned against civility. “You cannot be civil,” she explains, “with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for, what you care about.”

  • DeWeese for state representative

  • First came the noise that was soon followed by two flocks of noisy geese flying in V formation over the house. This is always a sure sign in Kentucky of the end of summer and the approach of fall.

  • The Tip O’Neill phrase “all politics is local” refers to how politicians, even on the national level, need to be able to relate to local constituencies to keep their legislative seats.

    But it has been applied a number of ways over the years, and Election 2018 gives us an opportunity to appropriate it for ourselves.

  • E.J.Dionne

    Columnist, The Washington Post

    ejdionne@washpost.com

    Who says politicians think only about the next election? In the battle over the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, the outcome each party respectively wants may hurt them in November’s elections.

    But the stakes are so high that neither side can afford to focus on politics alone.

  • MICHAEL GERSON
    columnist
    michaelgerson@washpost.com

     

    WASHINGTON — In the end, everything — every blasted thing — gets sucked into the polarization black hole, never to emerge again.

    That now includes the Supreme Court. It is not, of course, that this process has never been political before. But it has never been more clearly a function of contending culture war narratives.

  • Dr. Harry Spalding

    guest columnist, former mayor of Bardstown

    It is a general consensus of opinion that Russia interfered in the last American elections. Whether President Trump was involved in the interference remains to be proven. But what has happened since is playing into Russian hands.

  • Call things what they are

    Just as calling an illegal migrant an “undocumented citizen” or calling a man a woman (actually denying science) does not make it so. Calling a commonsense Democrat (an increasingly oxymoronic term) a Republican does not mean that you are offering unbiased reporting on an organic exodus from the GOP.

  • I am writing in response to the editorial in July 20 paper, taking exception to the new state sales tax, taken from the Bowling Green Daily News. Did you not read it?

    This new sales tax reflects the state’s new direction of going to a consumption tax while decreasing the state tax on our earnings. This follows actions taken by our neighboring states, Indiana and Tennessee. Instead of taxes being automatically taken from us, it puts more money in our pockets and allows us to be more in charge of how we utilize our earnings.

  • NELDA MOORE

    Community Columnist

    nmoore@bardstowncable.net

    I like that most liberals I know can laugh at themselves and enjoy jokes at their own expense. It appears to be another difference between them and die-hard conservatives.

    But while they seem to catch the joke behind the meme, it doesn’t stop some from going from the sublime to the ridiculous — and they need to be called out for it.