.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Editorials

  • EDITORIAL: Here’s to ‘the little things’

    Sometimes, it’s the little things in life that make us happy.

    Things like getting that last squeeze of toothpaste before you throw away the tube, finding a $5 bill in a coat pocket that you haven’t worn for a year, or winning $2 on a Powerball ticket.

    And sometimes the good things that seem little can have a major impact on your life, and the lives of others. Last week, one of those “little things” happened, but it could have a major impact on many people.

  • EDITORIAL: Make Farm to Table dinner an annual event

    Saturday, July 20, proved to be one of the hottest days of 2019 so far, part of the hottest week of the year. Despite that, however, more than 100 people turned out for this year’s Farm To Table dinner in sweltering conditions at the Farmer’s Market Pavilion downtown, showing a growing passion in the community for locally sourced food.

  • Declining fatal overdoses encouraging

    Opioid abuse, addiction and overdoses have reached epidemic levels in the United States in recent years, with Kentucky being near the top of the list as the most affected. Kentucky sits at fifth just behind West Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia, according to a 2017 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    The state was also mentioned as one of several with statistically significant increases in drug overdose death rates from 2016 to 2017.

  • Declining fatal overdoses encouraging

    Opioid abuse, addiction and overdoses have reached epidemic levels in the United States in recent years, with Kentucky being near the top of the list as the most affected. Kentucky sits at fifth just behind West Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia, according to a 2017 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    The state was also mentioned as one of several with statistically significant increases in drug overdose death rates from 2016 to 2017.

  • EDITORIAL: Bourbon spills, fish kills show need for consideration of stricter environmental regs

    The importance of bourbon to Kentucky is, without question, significant. From the $8.6 billion of revenue and more than 20,000 jobs produced for Kentucky, to the esteem it gives our state on a global scale, there is no doubt that bourbon is a hot commodity.

  • EDITORIAL: Briggs leaves legacy of generosity

    John “Jack” Briggs passed away in February 2017, but his legacy lives on through many different organizations in Nelson County.

    Over the past few weeks, various Nelson County organizations and entities have received checks that were left to them through Briggs’ estate. According to his last will and testament, he had no known living next of kin and an estimated $2.48 million in personal property.

  • EDITORIAL: Mind the heat, especially for those vulnerable

    Boy, it’s hot out there. Once humidity is factored in, the heat feels like it is more than 100 degrees outside the past week or so.

    And it is only set to get hotter. By this weekend, the mercury could almost reach triple digits, with Saturday’s forecast set to top out at 98 degrees.

    But it doesn’t have to be absurdly hot for summertime weather to have an effect on your health.

  • EDITORIAL: Study of St. John A.M.E Zion will help church’s ongoing mission

    Bardstown has long been known as Kentucky’s “Cradle of Catholicism,” and its impact on local life over the past two-plus centuries is well-documented.

    That’s not always been the case for other denominations in the area, as those denominations’ hierarchy is not as centralized and well-defined, with individual congregations having the autonomy to “do their own thing,” so to speak.

  • EDITORIAL: Bloomfield cell tower a win for residents, history

    Bloomfield celebrated its 200th anniversary as a city earlier this month. A stroll through its historic downtown streets can feel like walking back through time.

    Especially if you happen to be a frustrated (would-be) cell phone user, which describes Bloomfield’s residents’ state of mind for nearly two decades.

    Now, to those frustrated cell users’ relief, Bloomfield will no longer be stuck in the digital past, after approval Wednesday by the Nelson County Planning Commission of a long sought-after cell tower.

  • EDITORIAL: Buzick Lumber a shining example of successful local businesses

    Most of us have found ourselves in hardware hell, searching desperately for that bolt with the odd thread that will fit our latest repair project. And all too often we are alone in a cavernous store with no one to ask for help.

    Even if you find a store worker, chances are slim he might actually know what you are looking for, and even less likely to have any sort of useful advice.