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Editorials

  • EDITORIAL: Bike path extension good for cyclists, motorists

    The next phase of a bike and pedestrian pathway along John Rowan Boulevard is set to start soon, and it is money well spent by the city.

    The first phase of the multi-use path was done in 2014 when the state Department of Highways widened Ky. 245 from Springfield Road (U.S. 150) to Bloomfield Road (U.S. 62).

    The next phase, which is to be mostly funded by a grant, will extend the path from where it ends now in front of Mago Construction Co. to Padgett Way or Chambers Boulevard.

  • EDITORIAL: Boston school newspaper will teach, serve students

    OK, so maybe we are a little biased here, but it is welcome news that Boston School has started up its own student newspaper.

    The Boston Hive published its inaugural edition this month and printed 300 copies. This is the first year the school has put out a newspaper.

    The Hive will print monthly, but the lessons students will learn will be daily.

  • EDITORIAL: Smooth mayoral transition in Bloomfield good for community

    Eight years ago when she decided to file for the position of Bloomfield Mayor, Rhonda Hagan pledged to serve only for two terms.

    As it turns out, she will be stepping down from the post just shy of that mark.

  • EDITORIAL: Smooth mayoral transition in Bloomfield good for community

    Eight years ago when she decided to file for the position of Bloomfield Mayor, Rhonda Hagan pledged to serve only for two terms.

    As it turns out, she will be stepping down from the post just shy of that mark.

  • EDITORIAL: PRIDE game a good starting step for the year

    After the past decade of contentiousness, the Nelson County Schools system needed something to feel good about. Years of overbearing management from the top led to a school district that didn’t know which way was up, featuring near-constant staff turnover, and a wave of disciplinary problems. NCS was in the news far too often for the wrong reasons, especially in the months leading up to the ouster of the previous administration.

  • EDITORIAL: Sisters of Charity leadership reflects history, current mission

    The Sisters of Charity of Nazareth have reached another milestone in their 200-plus years of service, and it is a reflection of how the order has evolved into a truly international institution.

    For the next five years, the Central Leadership Team will consist of two members from India and one from the United States.

    President Sangeeta Ayithamattam and First Vice President Jackulin Jesu both have health care backgrounds. Second Vice President Adeline Fehribach comes from a background in education.

  • EDITORIAL: Templin and Fifth intersection warrants study, intervention

    The T intersection at Templin and Fifth is a messed-up intersection at the best of times.

    With the only stop sign at Fifth Street, traffic on Templin Avenue heading toward or away from Fourth does not have to yield, which can cause backups when school lets out on the Bardstown campus.

    This causes a harrowing situation for motorists, but at the times when students are headed to nearby Bardstown Schools, it can become downright dangerous.

  • EDITORIAL: Welcome to our town

    This week is a big one for Bardstown.

    As many as 60,000 people are expected in town to celebrate Kentucky Bourbon and its social and economic impact on this area. Thousands in Nelson County are employed by distilleries, or in the satellite businesses that support the industry.

  • EDITORIAL: Rural Kentucky needs direction, plan for reversing economic lag behind cities

    The economy is booming in the country and in Kentucky.

    At least, it is in some places. Metropolitan areas of our state are doing great, according to a recent report titled “The State of Working Kentucky 2018” by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy.

    Job growth in “Metro Kentucky” has rebounded since the economic recovery started in 2010. But rural areas have experienced “essentially no net job growth” over the past decade.

  • EDITORIAL: Bardstown H.S. and Junior ROTC

    Most people who have served in the military say that the important takeaway from the experience was an enhanced sense of discipline. The same benefit can also be found among high school students who participate in Junior Reserve Oficers’ Training Corps programs.

    Nelson County High School has had a Junior ROTC program affiliated with the Air Force for the past 18 years, and now 10 Bardstown High School students are enrolled in classes taught by Col. Donna Lucchese and Sgt. James Pfost at NCHS.