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Columns

  • ‘Where do we get these people?’

    In this season of gratitude, Bill Krissoff has a different notion of thankfulness than most of us.

    He feels “very lucky” to have been able to drop his orthopedic practice in Truckee, Calif. (a ski town in the Sierra Nevada), enlist in the Navy, and deploy to a war zone to repair the broken bodies of Marines — all at an age when most other people are making retirement plans.

  • Obama’s opportunity to be the decider

    We don’t define periods in American history by who held the majority in Congress. It was the Reagan Era, not the Tip O’Neill Era — just as we’re now living in the Obama Era, no matter what John Boehner or Mitch McConnell might hope.

    President Obama is being inundated with contradictory advice on what to do next, now that his party is losing its majority in the House and will have weaker control of the Senate. Most of the punditocracy’s counsel centers on how Obama should greet the strengthened and emboldened Republican opposition.

  • Giving thanks for a more enjoyable job

    As Thanksgiving approaches — and will be over by the time you read this — I’m reminded of the special circumstances that newspapers endure during the holidays. I know of no other business that has to contort itself quite as severely during Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s.

  • Blindness is most destructive weapon

    By Wednesday afternoon, the death toll at Phnom Penh’s annual Water Festival had climbed to 456 people. Eight hundred more were injured in what should have been a joyous occasion — a three-day festival to celebrate the naval victory of one of Cambodia’s most illustrious kings, King Jayavarman VII.

  • Technology can present problems

    Have you ever had one of these moments?

  • The incident at Bull Shoals, Ark.

  • New website, new possibilities

    Rhonda W. said she likes the new look of The Kentucky Standard website.

    “It is easy to navigate and so far have found nothing that I don’t like. Great job!!”

    Bruce likes being able to find the full paper online now in electronic form.

    “Now I can get the whole thing on my computer  — the place I both work and read. Thanks so much for this new delivery method.”

    Vicki thinks the new website makes us “look like a big city paper now. Great job to all involved in the make over.”

  • Eric Holder's misguided war on terrorism

    The Obama administration wants us to believe that one out of 285 ain’t bad.

    A jury in New York acquitted Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani on 284 out of 285 charges for his part in the murder of 224 people in the U.S. Embassy bombings in Tanzania and Kenya in 1998. Attorney General Eric Holder thought the trial would be a glorious showcase for the civilian court system. We’d stun the terrorists with our courtroom procedure, win over the world with our mincing legalisms, and salve our consciences after the horrors of the Bush years.

  • Obama's opportunity to be the decider

    We don’t define periods in American history by who held the majority in Congress. It was the Reagan Era, not the Tip O’Neill Era — just as we’re now living in the Obama Era, no matter what John Boehner or Mitch McConnell might hope.

    President Obama is being inundated with contradictory advice on what to do next, now that his party is losing its majority in the House and will have weaker control of the Senate. Most of the punditocracy’s counsel centers on how Obama should greet the strengthened and emboldened Republican opposition.

  • Pen and paper still matter for writers

    There’s been a lot of talk about whether the handwritten word is becoming obsolete. The keyboard is the pen of the future, and computer coding is the new language. Cursive and handwriting are dropping out of curriculums left and right. There is no mention of the words “handwriting” or “cursive” in the 24-page Kentucky Core Content for Assessment in writing, released in 2006. In the Combined Curriculum Content for primary writing, it is mentioned once, with the emphasis placed on legibility.