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Columns

  • OPINION: Kentucky Fried Education

    Apologies to Chris Tobe for purloining from the title of his 2018 book, “Kentucky Fried Pensions.” Tobe also happens to be a nationally known pension plan expert who is running for the Democratic nomination for state auditor.

    I borrowed the title because of what I see happening to public education in this state. Gov. Matt Bevin and the Republican-dominated Kentucky Legislature seem determined to destroy our system of public education.

    Cases in point:

  • Words to the wise in buying property

    I am often asked the most probable and most obvious question when I run into friends, especially those who know me from the many years I have spent in real estate. How is the market right now? Is it a good time to jump in or run away? That’s really not a simple question to answer.

  • OPINION: These are not your daddy’s Democrats

    The editor of The Kentucky Standard wrote in a recent column that one of his readers accused him of putting out a liberal paper based on the predominantly Democrat-leaning cartoons, columns and opinion pieces. The editor stated that basically, those are the types of pieces submitted to the paper, and that he would like to have other viewpoints as well.

    So, here’s a different viewpoint.

  • OPINION: Violent extremism in all forms is deplorable, full stop.

    What’s clear from the most recent attacks in Christchurch and Utrecht along with others like Orlando, San Bernadino, Quebec City, Charleston, and Utoya, Norway, is that no single group has a monopoly on violent extremism. Even the groups that we have viewed as notoriously peaceful, Buddhists, are today committing massive atrocities against their Muslim neighbors in Myanmar. Francophone Cameroonians are warring with their English-speaking neighbors because those neighbors want more rights. The major faultline between the two groups primarily being linguistic.

  • OPINION: Accountability makes good government

    As various House committees gear up for a season of investigations and hearings on President Trump and his administration, a lot of people are worried that progress on the nation’s challenges will grind to a halt. I would argue just the opposite: the wheels of government are turning in favor of accountability.

  • OPINION: Democrats need moderate candidates

    Gov. Matt Bevin couldn’t attend Nelson County’s Republican dinner because he needed Vice President Mike Pence’s help in Lexington.

    That’s because, unlike President Trump, Bevin isn’t popular in Kentucky at the moment. His approval rating in February was 27 percent, according to SurveyUSA.

    “Polls, schmolls,” Bevin told reporters.

    He has a point.

    If elections were decided by polls, Jack Conway would be governor. So take what I’m about to say with a grain of salt.

  • OPINION: Democrats need moderate candidates

    Gov. Matt Bevin couldn’t attend Nelson County’s Republican dinner because he needed Vice President Mike Pence’s help in Lexington.

    That’s because, unlike President Trump, Bevin isn’t popular in Kentucky at the moment. His approval rating in February was 27 percent, according to SurveyUSA.

    “Polls, schmolls,” Bevin told reporters.

    He has a point.

    If elections were decided by polls, Jack Conway would be governor. So take what I’m about to say with a grain of salt.

  • OPINION: That special teacher
  • OPINION: Renewing democracy after Trump

    WASHINGTON — A central challenge of the Trump era is how to deal urgently with the president’s transgressions while also taking steps to prevent politicians from abusing power in the future.

    Equally important is restoring faith in our republican democracy as a genuinely representative system that is open to broad participation and protected from the outsized influence of the financially privileged.

  • OPINION: Vaccination skeptics make intrusive public health methods more likely

    WASHINGTON — Another massive study has discovered no causal connection between the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine and autism.

    This time, the study’s cohort consisted of every child born in Denmark from 1999 through December 2010 — more than 650,000 children. The conclusion? “The study strongly supports that MMR vaccination does not increase the risk for autism, does not trigger autism in susceptible children, and is not associated with clustering of autism cases after vaccination.”