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Government

  • Bloomfield discusses bicentennial plans

    The calendar has just passed the halfway mark of the current year, but residents in Bloomfield are already looking forward to 2019.

    The northeast Nelson County community will be celebrating its bicentennial then, and Brent Long told the Bloomfield City Council at its Monday meeting there are several major events already in the works.

  • New state laws go into effect July 14

    FRANKFORT — Most new laws approved during the Kentucky General Assembly’s 2018 session go into effect on Saturday, July 14.

    That means drivers will soon be required to leave at least three feet of space between their vehicles and cyclists they pass. Children under the age of 17 will not be allowed to get married. And penalties will get tougher for those who post sexually explicit images online without the consent of the person depicted.

  • Royalty reaches deal with prosecutors

    Former Bardstown Mayor John Royalty reached a potential agreement with prosecutors Friday that included that he not run for public office again for five years and he drop his lawsuit against the city.

    In exchange, the commonwealth’s attorney would defer prosecuting him on a felony perjury indictment and other misdemeanors related to his time in office. The city also agreed to drop its suit against the former mayor.

  • County Republicans have executive director, office

    The Republican Party of Nelson County took a couple of big strides forward this month by creating an executive director’s position and establishing an office in anticipation of the Nov. 6 general election.

    Doug Alexander of Bardstown will be responsible for operations, including building the party, recruiting volunteers, pre-election planning and managing events.

  • July 3 Nelson County Fiscal Court briefs

    County gets grant for Wickland work

    County Judge-Executive Dean Watts informed the magistrates and audience at the July 3 Fiscal Court meeting that for fourth or fifth year, the Sara Trigg Family Trust had given the county a grant for the upkeep of the historic mansion that was the home of three governors — two of Kentucky and one of Louisiana — in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

    The Trigg family sold the house to the county years ago and annually donates money for repairs.

  • Bloomfield City Council briefs from June 11

    The members of the Bloomfield City Council made one thing perfectly clear at their meeting on Monday night.

    They are adamantly opposed to any proposed fee increases from the Joint City-County Planning Commission of Nelson County.

    The council spent nearly 45 minutes discussing the issue before ultimately passing a resolution to oppose the increase and refused to support any line item adjustment over 8 percent.

    However, the commission had withdrawn the proposal in an email sent June 8, but city officials in Bloomfield had overlooked the notice.

  • Man sentenced to one month in prison for Rand Paul assault

    The U.S. attorney’s office in Indianapolis announced Friday the man who assaulted U.S. Sen. Rand Paul was sentenced to 30 days in jail, although it did not name Paul as the victim.

    Josh J. Minkler, the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana, announced that a Bowling Green man was sentenced for assaulting “a member of congress resulting in personal injury, a felony under federal law,” the release stated.

  • Northeast Nelson Fire to raise tax; budget increases $48,000

    The Northeast Nelson Fire Protection District is increasing its property tax to help pay for equipment and, eventually, a new fire station in Fairfield.

    The tax is going from 7 to 10 cents per $100 of assessed value — $10 for every $10,000 of real estate value.

  • Bardstown city budget breaks from utility subsidies

    Bardstown Utilities customers, including those outside the city limits, will no longer be subsidizing city general services such as police and fire protection, street maintenance and recreation through the fees they pay for their water, sewer, electric, cable and internet services.

    The Bardstown City Council on Tuesday held the first reading of its 2019 fiscal year budget, which, for the first time, avoids using revenue from the combined utilities funds to prop up the general fund.

  • Watts lists park county’s options to clarify acreage

    Nelson County Judge-Executive Dean Watts sent an email to The Standard and four county magistrates Monday morning clarifying the amount of acreage the county maintains.

    Watts said the county currently maintains more than 94 acres of space, “not including what each city has to offer.”

    Watts listed Dean Watts Park as 77 acres, although the county’s comprehensive plan includes an inventory of local parks and only lists it as 35 acres.

    Watts also listed the park in Culvertown as 15 acres the county maintains and two acres in Balltown.