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Outdoors

  • STRAIGHT ARROW: A miserable, wet trip

    After climbing San Luis Peak, Bonnie and I spent a night in Del Norte, Colo. Then, on the morning of July 6, 1989, we drove to Durango, where we met up with Jack and Ellen Hume, friends from Lexington with whom we have climbed ever since.

    Plans had already been made for the four of us to hike into Chicago Basin, and from a base camp at about 11,500 feet, attempt to climb one or more of the three Fourteeners you can approach from this basin.

  • OUTDOOR TALES: Winter is prime time for hiking

    Winter doesn’t have to be a time for the “blahs” and a can’t wait for spring attitude. The groundhog has done his thing, but no matter what, we still have some winter weather left.

    It probably isn’t the favorite season of most, but winter isn’t a bad thing. It’s a great time for hiking, walking in the woods, trying your luck at walleye or sauger fishing, or just getting outdoors.

  • STRAIGHT ARROW: Climbing San Luis Peak, Colorado 1998

    With the archery deer season over, I start to think about our trips to the mountains of Colorado, and I would like to share a few more of our climbs with you.

    In early July 1998, Bonnie and I flew back to Colorado to continue climbing the 14,000-foot mountains there. We had flown into Colorado Springs on July 3, rented a car and headed to Lake City in the central part of the state. We enjoyed a leisure day in a neat little western town, had time to get our gear sorted, went to the grocery, had a good meal, then spent the night at the Lake City Motel.

  • OUTDOOR TALES: Yo-yo weather is good for syrup-making

    The numbers aren’t large, but there still are people who make maple syrup. It’s tasty, a sign of spring, and a lot of work.

    Maple syrup time is when the wonderful aroma of cooking syrup wafts its way down the valleys from sugar camp hills.

    Making maple syrup is almost a lost art. Most people who make the sweet, tasty syrup in this part of the country do it for the enjoyment and make enough to earn a few bucks and provide a supply for family and friends.

  • STRAIGHT ARROW: The hawk and the bowhunter

    On Feb. 4, I made a delivery trip to the town of Oil Springs in Eastern Kentucky, and early on that trip, I saw a large hawk sitting in a tree.

    This trip takes me about seven hours round-trip, with nothing to do but drive, listen to the radio and think.

    Well, seeing that hawk sitting on a limb watching the grassy median along the Bluegrass Parkway and the underbrush and woods on the other side of the fence got me to thinking that our hunting methods are a lot alike.

  • OUTDOOR TALES: It doesn't get much better than fried crappie

    There is nothing finer on a cold winter day than reaching into the freezer and pulling out a bag of crappie filets to fry for dinner. 

    Well, there is one thing better, if, despite the cold and some ice, you have been lucky enough to catch fresh crappie through the ice or from a lake with open water.

    There are many tasty fish, but crappie is at or near the top of my list, and it seems they taste even better when prepared on a day unfit for catching fresh ones. Those caught earlier and carefully frozen will do just fine.

  • STRAIGHT ARROW: Seven months till bow season opens

    While seven months sounds like a long time, there are a lot of things to do to pass the time and be better prepared for the early September opening.

  • OUTDOOR TALES: Groundhog day forecasts usually questionable

    If you have a coin in your pocket, you have a predictor of spring about the equal of the groundhog, which is looked upon for a forecast each Feb. 2.

    Around my place, Feb. 2 is a special day. It’s the day Punxsutawney Phil and his pals are pulled from their den to determine if they see their shadow, and it’s also my wife Phyllis’ birthday. 

    It’s interesting both the famous weather forecaster and the Mr. are both named Phil. And since the two events the Phils celebrate coincide, I don’t forget the birthday. 

  • STRAIGHT ARROW: Visiting an old bowhunting friend

    A month ago, I had ordered another load of targets and was scheduled to pick them up last Thursday.

    While attending the Archery Trade Association show on Jan. 6, Bonnie and I ran into M.R. James and his wife, Janet. During our conversation, I told M.R. that we had been picking targets up at American Whitetail Inc., and had been meaning to call him and try to visit him in Evansville.

  • OUTDOOR TALES: Snow brings back ice cream memories

    Winter storm Jonas, which gained the name Snowzilla, caused much hardship for many as it swept across the South and Midwest to the east coast.

    No storm is a good thing, but for some it has its good points, especially if it drops just a few inches of fresh, white stuff in your area.

    Youngsters in particular enjoy snow. It is a time for sleds, building snowmen, playing fox and geese, and making snow ice cream. Snow ice cream is a winter delight forgotten by many, and probably not thought of by many others.