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Opinion

  • While we may not like to admit it, hunger is everywhere, in every single community, including Nelson County.

    While the economy has been improving, food insecurity and poverty remain higher than before the Great Recession of 2008 began. And while food insecurity rates have declined, the millions of people still facing hunger could be falling further behind.

  • A father is the best teacher there is to be a father.

    There’s no handbook that I have found. There are plenty of books and websites willing to dispense advice. But as I near the one-decade mark of being a father to two little boys, what I find most valuable are the lessons my father taught me.

    He was not perfect, but he did more right than he got wrong. I’m sure I am making my own mistakes, and will make more in the future, but I hope that in the end I can live up to providing my boys with as good a father as I had.

  • It was a great relief to have Mr. Twitter out of the country for nine whole days, and the entire country felt it, like when your neighbor with the busted muffler goes away for a while and takes his yappy dog with him, and you realize what a beautiful thing common civility can be. We were able to turn to the joys of life and forget the absurdities for a while.

  • So what if, in his speech last week to NATO, Donald Trump didn’t explicitly reaffirm the provision that an attack on one is an attack on all?

    What’s the big deal? Didn’t he affirm a general commitment to NATO during his visit? Hadn’t he earlier sent his vice president and secretaries of state and defense to pledge allegiance to Article 5?

    And anyway, who believes that the United States would really go to war with Russia — and risk nuclear annihilation — over Estonia?

  • Gov. Steve Beshear was vilified by his erstwhile supporters for challenging a federal judge’s decision to overturn Kentucky’s constitutional ban on same-sex marriage, but in his recently published memoir, he reveals that he was on their side.

    “People Over Politics,” which Beshear co-authored with his chief speechwriter, Dan Hassert, and had published by A Stronger Kentucky Inc., a charitable foundation, is an account of his eight years as governor, from 2007 through 2015.

  • A constituent of mine recently brought to my attention that too often we let the discussion about Kentucky’s drug scourge fall by the wayside. Admittedly, I believe that happens because no one has a good solution to the problem, and although we have made effort after effort to combat the epidemic, we still have little to show for it. In 2015, Kentucky’s heroin-related death rate increased to 6.9 deaths for every 100,000 people — 23 times the rate in 2009.

  • Once again, politics has ruled over expert recommendations when it comes to establishing needle exchange programs.

  • On Thursday, May 4, a young couple checking out in front of me at Save-a-Lot grocery paid for my groceries. I did not realize this until they had already left the store. I looked for them in the parking lot in order to thank them, but did not see them. I am hoping that they see this in the paper and know that I appreciated their kind gesture and have “payed it forward.”
    Thank you again,
    Glenna Jorgensen
    Bardstown

  • I (Paula Simpson- Chairperson of Relay For Life) would like to say thank you to our community for all the support that was shown at Relay For Life of Nelson County this year. With a change of venue, date and times along with other events going on, I was not sure how it would turn out, but we had a beautiful day and a great turnout from the community.
     I sincerely thank everyone who came and supported us and the survivors. Thanks to those who donated money, time, talent, merchandise and for caring about the people who matter to them and others.

  • The fifth annual An Afternoon With the Past took place Saturday, May 13, in Bloomfield. Approximately 200 were in attendance.
    This year we honored our veterans. More than 300 framed veterans’ photos were on display. These photos will soon be hung on The Veterans Wall at American Legion Post 288 in Bloomfield. Thanks to the Legion for donating the frames and wall. (This is a continuing project for any and all veterans from Bloomfield, Chaplin and Fairfield. Thus, additional veterans photos will always be accepted.)

  • I’ve had a number of conversations recently that convince me our country is divided into two political camps separated by a deep and uncomfortably wide gap. No, I’m not talking about liberals and conservatives, or pro- and anti-Trump voters. I’m talking about people who believe in politics and our political system, and people who don’t.

  • As many as two million Americans are struggling with prescription drug addiction across the nation. Tragically, heroin and opioid overdoses claim an average of 91 lives every day. This startling trend continues to get worse, especially here in Kentucky.

    But together, we can do more to fight back, and I will continue to assist those in Kentucky who are working to fight the epidemic.

  • Mercifully, a tumultuous school year at Old Kentucky Home Middle School has come to an end.

    And while outraged parents and teachers can breathe a sigh of relief that this local nightmare has ended, it’s only temporary. In just two short months, another school year begins, and it has become hard to imagine that a two-month cooling off period will completely bring an end to the frequently out-of-control student behavior, punctuated with routine reports of student-on-student and student-on-teacher violence.

  • “Whom the gods would destroy, they first tempt to resolve the Arab-Israeli conflict.” — Irving Kristol

    The quixotic American pursuit of Middle East peace is a perennial. It invariably fails, yet every administration feels compelled to give it a try. The Trump administration is no different.

  • Thank you to the people of New Haven for a fantastic participation at the third annual New Haven Appreciation Day.
    This year’s event drew over 400 attendees, and all had a great time.
    A special thank you to all of the helpers and the musicians that participated. The giving of their time to put on a great night of music and fun for the residents of southern Nelson County is truly appreciated.
    The success of this year’s events had all of those involved talking of how to improve it for next year.

  • Grendel’s evil mother hid in the depths of water. The evil foe in Afghanistan hid in caves.
    Ask the mother of any U.S. service person whose life matters more.
    Joe McGuire
    Boston

  • The images we have of him are of youthful vigor and charm, so it’s hard to imagine that if he were still alive today, President John F. Kennedy would be 100 years old on Memorial Day.

    We can only wonder what he might have achieved in a second term as president or what kind of an elder statesman he would have been.

  • The Memorial Day that we will observe nationally on Monday, May 29, had its beginning during the American Civil War — a turbulent time for Nelson County. More than 80 different Union units were involved in skirmishes and set up camps in the county during the war. The county’s turnpikes and railroads dictated the movement of many troops and supplies through the area — both Union and Confederate.

    In the end the Civil War would take the lives of over 600,000 soldiers nationally, both North and South, from 1861 to 1865.