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Features

  • emccoy@kystandard.com

    Bardstown will be the first stop in author Mary W. Schaller’s effort to promote her new book, “Deliver Us From Evil: A Southern Belle in Europe at the Outbreak of World War I” — and appropriately so. The book tells the true story of Schaller’s grandmother, Nancy Johnson, a Bardstown native, who traveled to Europe only to find herself in the middle of a political upheaval that was difficult to escape.

  • Angie Greer’s family knew before she did Saturday she would become the next Bloomfield Tobacco Festival Queen.

    As 12 members of Greer’s family waited anxiously among the packed crowd in the Bloomfield Middle School gym, 1981 Queen Lorrie Morris Burba spun the numbered pink and white wheel.

    But Burba didn’t spin it hard enough, Greer’s aunt, Lisa Monroe, said.

    “I thought she’d have to spin it again, and it was slowing down for Angie’s name,” she said.

  • Around 9:43 a.m. Sept. 11, Michael Long heard a loud crash and looked out his office window.

    “We looked out the window and saw flames,” he said. “It was more smoke than anything but we saw flames as well.”

    The flames and smoke were coming from the Pentagon.

    Michael Long, a legislative and public affairs specialist with the Department of Treasury in Washington, D.C., didn’t know the reason for the flames.

  • The “Lincoln as a Boy” statue returned to its original spot Thursday on Lincoln Square – just in time for the weekend’s Lincoln Days Celebration.

    The sculpture, a depiction of Abraham Lincoln at age 7 standing with his dog, Honey, was knocked from its base by a car on April 10.

    It was dragged under the front end of the car across the traffic island, suffering scrapes, scratches and dents. Honey lost part of an ear.

  • This year's Lincoln Days Festival honoring Hodgenville’s famous native son was marked by cool temperatures, a light breeze and sunny skies.

    The Saturday morning crowd appeared light but picked up as visitors arrived for the 2 p.m. parade.

    Seven men vied for the coveted title of Lincoln Lookalike while three women competed for the Mary Todd Lookalike contest.

    John Mansfield of Nashville, Tenn., won his third title. He won in 2006 and 2008 and also won the oratory contest back-to-back in 2007 and 2008.

  • 2011 is the sesquicentennial of the start of the Civil War. To help remember and honor that pivotal event in our history, the Civil War Museum of the Western Theater (that part of the nation west of the Appalachians) will call to attention certain artifacts which help to tell the story of that era. This is the 19th article in a weekly series that will appear in Wednesday issues of The Kentucky Standard.

  • If working for drum lessons wasn’t enough, now I would be working to pay for the kitchen window I broke when I tossed my drumsticks into the air. I was sure my parents were unhappy I’d purchased the drums without their permission and unhappy about the gaping hole we now had in our house. Dad had mentioned the drums might very well cause a civil war — at the very least a divided doghouse.

  • Miss Wanda Mae Thomas, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilton Thomas, Chaplin, will compete with 21 other girls from rural Kentucky for the title “Miss Kentucky REA” at the Kentucky State Fair in Louisville. The contest will be in the Horse Show Pavilion on Friday, Sept. 7 at 7:30 p.m.

    Miss Thomas is eligible for the state finals by virtue of her selection as queen of the Salt River Rural Electric Co-op during the annual membership meeting held this summer.

  • 2011 is the sesquicentennial of the start of the Civil War. To help remember and honor that pivotal event in our history, the Civil War Museum of the Western Theater (that part of the nation west of the Appalachians) will call to attention certain artifacts which help to tell the story of that era. This is the 16th article in a weekly series that will appear in Wednesday issues of The Kentucky Standard.

  • Bardstown’s St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral, long recognized for its history and architecture, has been named a minor basilica by the Vatican.

    Archbishop Thomas C. Kelly made the announcement last Monday.  Although the church’s pastor, the Rev. Bill Medley, told parishioners the news at the Masses Aug. 26-28.

    The term basilica is a designation given to certain churches because of their historical importance, iniquity, dignity or significance as a place of worship.

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  • A membership appreciation team from American Legion Post 121 was participating in presenting membership cards and a gift to some of their members for outstanding service. Gilbert Shain, 62 continuous years of  membership and George Hoffman with 65 years of continuous years of  membership.

  • Here’s a sampling of events you might want to check out

     

     

  • 60 years ago

    August

    1951

    Sister Raymunda new principal at local academy

     

    New principal of Bethlehem Academy, Bardstown, is Sister Raymunda, who succeeds Sister Marietta, who has been assigned to teach at Presentation Academy, Louisville.