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Features

  • Browning Brothers meet in Korea after long separation

     

    The two sons of Mrs. Orrin Hill, Bardstown, Cpl. Doyle Browning and Pfc. Russell Browning, rejoiced when they met recently in Korea. It was a real thrill for them, particularly Doyle ,who has spent 44 months overseas.

    When Russell arrived at Pusan he was granted a 3-day pass to go to Kojido Island to look up his brother. He traveled as far as he could and then reached Doyle by telephone and asked him to come get him.

  • Here’s a sampling of events you might want to check out

     

  • 2011 is the sesquicentennial of the start of the Civil War. To help remember and honor that pivotal event in our history, the Civil War Museum of the Western Theater (that part of the nation west of the Appalachians) will call to attention certain events which help to tell the story of that era. This is the 26th article in a weekly series.

     

  • November 1971

     

    Bloomfield tobacco market opened strong with record prices

     

    Bloomfield market average $78.62, but “no stripping” weather slows sales average of $78.66 per hundredweight on 226,278 pounds of burley in the first auction of the 1971 nelson County Co-op warehouse.

    For the first time in history Bloomfield warehouses didn’t have enough tobacco on the floors to make full sales Tuesday or Wednesday.

  • Emily Hunt Case, 35, Bloomfield, director of human resources; Timothy Dewayne Curtsinger, 37, Bloomfield, business owner.

    Lisa Dale Guinn, 46, Chaplin, unemployed; Anthony Wayne Bosco, 42, Chaplin, inventory auditor.

    Heather Nicole Hye, 32, Lebanon, Zappos; Joshua Paul Sanborn, 28, Lebanon, unemployed.

    Ashley N. Hardin, 25, Bardstown, Zappos; Brandon M. Hagan, 26, Bardstown, engineer.

    Heather Renee Gies, 29, Bardstown, dental hygienist; Robert Ray Marksbury, 38, Bardstown, construction.

  • Springfield native Katherine Fields, 20, recently won the Miss UK Thoroughbred pageant at the University of Kentucky.

    Fields, who was nominated by her Alpha Delta Pi sisters to be the sorority’s representative was one of 12 contestants in the pageant. She said she wanted to show her gratitude to her sorority sisters by representing them to the best of her ability.

    “It meant a lot to win because I was representing them, and even Springfield,” Fields said via e-mail.

  • 2011 is the sesquicentennial of the start of the Civil War. To help remember and honor that pivotal event in our history, the Civil War Museum of the Western Theater (that part of the nation west of the Appalachians) will call to attention certain events which help to tell the story of that era. This is the 25th article in a weekly series that will appear in Wednesday issues of The Kentucky Standard.

  • Born one month premature, Sean Anthony Dunn had an undeveloped heart and lungs.

    From birth Dunn was whisked away to Kosair Children’s Hospital where he spent the first two and half weeks of his life.

    Although eventually he was strong enough to go home, Dunn was not well —he had developed a heart murmur that was undetected for two years.

  • At midnight during a full moon, a person can place his ear to the lawn in front of the Old Courthouse in downtown Bardstown and hear a weepy violin being played underground, according to Certified Ghost Hunter Patti Starr. Some have said the fiddler’s lonely tune can even be heard in the basement of the courthouse. Some say the fiddler plays every Thursday at midnight.

  • Local historian Dixie Hibbs doesn’t refer to Wickland as haunted. She likes to say it’s active — active with spirits.

    In fact, some of its original inhabitants may still linger inside the walls of the historic mansion.

  • The secret to Bardstown’s fame as a haunted town — a draw for spirits and ghosts and those who seek them, a place where shadows play in the windows and along the corridors of historic homes — lies somewhere underground. At least, that’s what Patti Starr believes.

  • 2011 is the sesquicentennial of the start of the Civil War. To help remember and honor that pivotal event in our history, the Civil War Museum of the Western Theater (that part of the nation west of the Appalachians) will call to attention certain events which help to tell the story of that era. This is the 23rd article in a weekly series that will appear in Wednesday issues of The Kentucky Standard.

  • A grove of trees — ash, hackberry, and a pin oak still flush with autumn leaves — shades more than a dozen headstones beside a pond in Cox’s Creek. A few stones are worn until the words are no longer visible; on others, the names are chiseled so deeply that even 160 years after their deaths, their memory rings clear.

    A low rock wall still abuts this cemetery on all sides, but according to the property owner, the gravestones are not where they should be.

  • Plans to open a new subdivision  at the western edge of Bardstown to be called Hubbard Subdivision were told at a meeting of the Bardstown City Council Tuesday night by E.E. Hubbard who asked the Council’s cooperation in improvement of the addition.

    Mayor Frank Wilson appointed members of the light, water and street committees to work with Mr. Hubbard.

    The new subdivision will front on the Shepherdsville Road and may be entered from Barber Ave.

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  • SPRINGFIELD, KY — 1851 Historic Maple Hill Manor Bed & Breakfast has been selected for inclusion in the BedandBreakfast.com Diamond Collection, a distinction reserved for premier inns offering extensive amenities and top-rated guest reviews. Launched in 2009, the Diamond Collection was introduced to help travelers streamline their search for the country’s best inns. 1851 Historic Maple Hill Manor Bed &  Breakfast is the first and only B&B in Kentucky to receive the BedandBreakfast.com Diamond Collection designation.

  • The landscape paintings of Cynthia Kelly Overall and Betty Campbell, Kentucky fine artists, have been selected for display and public viewing Oct. 15-Nov. 5 at B. Deemer Gallery, 2650 Frankfort Ave., Louisville. It is an honor for local artists to be recognized in a special show at the professional level for their achievements.

  • Cindy Hutchins has had breast problems all her life. Since she was a teenager, she’s had operations to remove lumps and irregularities that always left one of her breasts bigger than the other. As a result, she was rarely comfortable in any bra she ever purchased.

    When she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2004, things got worse.