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Letters

  • READERS’ VIEWS: Feb. 1, 2015

    To the editor,

    Hello Bardstown,

    My name is Roger Dunn, and I am from Carlisle. This past weekend, on Jan. 25, my father and I headed out to travel to Elizabethtown. On our way, however, the belt on my truck broke. Luckily we were near exit 21 on the Bluegrass Parkway.

  • READERS’ VIEWS: Jan. 30, 2015

    President Franklin Roosevelt and civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. repeatedly warned us about these false slogans like “right to work.” They knew then that this type of legislation did not offer any rights or work, and was only designed to lower wages while taking away our rights in the workplace. It is actually a right to work for less.

  • READERS’ VIEWS: Jan. 30, 2015

    Congratulations and thanks to all Nelson County residents and storekeepers who had enough sensitivity to leave your Christmas decorations up at least through New Year’s Day.

    You have true common sense and the spirit of the season. You know when the season occurs and that its supposed to last awhile.

    I’ve heard of some cold, insensitive people who put decorations up on Christmas Eve and can’t wait to yank ‘em down before Christmas Day is over. Shame!

  • READERS’ VIEWS: Jan. 28, 2015

    An aspect of bullying that is seldom addressed is that these school bullies don’t automatically disappear when they leave school. In fact, if this behavior is not stopped, and they are not taught a way to socialize other than controlling and manipulating people; they will continue this bullying behavior as adults.

  • READERS’ VIEWS: Jan. 21, 2015

    We join the rest of the world in mourning the brave staff of the magazine Charlie Hebdo, gunned down by religious fanatics for defending freedom of the press.

    Meat industry fanatics in the U.S. have devised a more subtle means of stifling freedom of the press. The states of Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota and Utah have enacted “ag-gag” laws that impose criminal penalties on investigators seeking to expose animal abuses and safety violations in factory farms.

  • READERS’ VIEWS: Jan. 21, 2015

    We join the rest of the world in mourning the brave staff of the magazine Charlie Hebdo, gunned down by religious fanatics for defending freedom of the press.

    Meat industry fanatics in the U.S. have devised a more subtle means of stifling freedom of the press. The states of Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota and Utah have enacted “ag-gag” laws that impose criminal penalties on investigators seeking to expose animal abuses and safety violations in factory farms.

  • READERS’ VIEWS: Jan. 21, 2015

    We join the rest of the world in mourning the brave staff of the magazine Charlie Hebdo, gunned down by religious fanatics for defending freedom of the press.

    Meat industry fanatics in the U.S. have devised a more subtle means of stifling freedom of the press. The states of Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota and Utah have enacted “ag-gag” laws that impose criminal penalties on investigators seeking to expose animal abuses and safety violations in factory farms.

  • READERS’ VIEWS: Jan. 21, 2015

    When you send a polite letter of inquiry to six elected senators and representatives, and copy it to four newspapers, including this one, and get one response (David Floyd, Jan. 19), what would you conclude? The subject is too taboo to discuss? Maybe the letter was too long. This is a condensed version.

  • NOTES OF THANKS: Jan. 14, 2015

    St. Vincent de Paul received many donations throughout the Christmas season, and we just want to acknowledge the generosity of the community and thank you sincerely for all we received. 

    Several companies and schools had food drives, which greatly benefited our food pantry. St. Joseph School and Bethlehem High School collected over 1,000 canned goods and monetary donations, and St. Gregory’s school presented us with a $2,700 check for the food pantry.

  • READERS’ VIEWS: Jan. 14, 2015

    To the editor:

    I, with my brothers and sisters, grew up in Bardstown in the ’50s and ’60s, a time not fraught with the angst faced by many young people today. A time not filled with too much, yet, nothing to do to fill our days, whether in school, on the farm or at home in town. I think times were much easier then. They are not easy today for our young people and those responsible for them.