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Editorials

  • Editorial: School taxes and feedback are important

    Local taxes can make up the majority of the funding — sometimes as much as half — that is available for our schools. With all the cuts in school funding on the state and national levels in recent years, and the general budget cutting that has been felt by all of us, local funding is a necessity. And that funding comes from our taxes.

    The Bardstown Independent Schools Board recently set a preliminary 4 percent increase in tax revenue over last year. This adds 1.7 cents per $100 property value, or $17 per $100,000.

  • Editorial: Meals from the Heart in need of volunteers to combat loneliness

    The Meals from the Heart feeding program — started earlier this summer  by the St. Vincent de Paul Ministries — has been an unbridled success, but now needs more volunteers to get prepared meals for homebound folks to their kitchens.

    Currently, 60 people are being served, but there is a waiting list of almost 20 more, and some of the original volunteers are being lost to the newly starting school year.

  • EDITORIAL: Our children don’t just learn in classrooms

    It’s that time of year again. Parents with children know it all too well. Those of us without them do, too.

    Back-to-school season is in full swing. The aisles of notebooks and crayons are overflowing in stores. The drop-off and pick-up lines are overflowing into morning and afternoon traffic.

  • EDITORIAL: It is important we preserve, not destroy, our history

    Anytime we lose a part of our precious local history, it’s a day of mourning. The recent acts of vandalism and arson at the Wickland property are sad reminders that some individuals, especially youth, don’t fully understand that their actions have lasting consequences for generations to come.

  • Editorial: Volunteers important to preserving history

    Nelson County is drenched in history, starting out as a frontier outpost before Kentucky even became a state. Its streets, cemeteries, backroads, museums, buildings and other structures — many of which were borne out of roots in the Catholic Church and the distilling industry — call out to residents and visitors alike with whispers of the past, making our home a destination spot for guests from all over the country and the world.

    But if it’s still going to be there in another 200 years, it must be protected.

  • Editorial: Beekeepers have it right about Kentucky Proud product labels

    Our Nelson County beekeepers have it right. The requirements needed to earn a Kentucky Proud label need to be tightened up by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

    The regulations, as currently written, allow such a marketing label to be affixed to a product, such as a jar of honey, when it has been “processed” in Kentucky. This means a barrel of honey can be imported from China, rebottled in smaller containers in an Ashland processing factory, then be granted a Kentucky Proud sticker.

  • Editorial: Isaiah House is saving lives, growing to meet needs

    Isaiah House is the largest faith-based or “Christ-centered” drug treatment and rehab program in Kentucky and serves the entire state.

    The mission of the program is “to provide the best possible addiction treatment care” for clients and their families. Isaiah House is not just a religious mission. It is a state-licensed alcohol and other drug entity and a state-licensed behavioral health service organization. It is also one of the few treatment centers in the state to achieve national accreditation by the Kentucky Joint Commission.

  • EDITORIAL: Isaiah House is saving lives, growing to meet needs

    Isaiah House is the largest faith-based or “Christ-centered” drug treatment and rehab program in Kentucky and serves the entire state.

    The mission of the program is “to provide the best possible addiction treatment care” for clients and their families. Isaiah House is not just a religious mission. It is a state-licensed alcohol and other drug entity and a state-licensed behavioral health service organization. It is also one of the few treatment centers in the state to achieve national accreditation by the Kentucky Joint Commission.

  • Editorial: Local NAACP chapter aims to protect equality for all

    After 12 years, Nelson County once again has a branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. And a good case can be made that its local rebirth is a result of a perception by many that the country is going the wrong direction concerning voter rights.

    The Rev. Jewel Brock, who was elected last week as president of the branch, says that is why he decided to get involved although he is not a joiner.

  • Editorial: With Orr out, new superintendent will have work to do