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Editorials

  • 200 years and still going

    The Diocese of Bardstown kicks off its bicentennial celebration Tuesday with a day of prayer.

    It’s quite an accomplishment for any religious organization to reach that milestone. It’s even more exciting that the Diocese began in Bardstown, a town already steeped in history.

  • Budget can be good or bad

    Coming out of Frankfort, good budget or bad budget? It all depends on one’s perspective. Given the sour economy, however, some belt tightening in government is in our best interest, although such maneuvering is never accomplished without pain. Certainly the private sector is seeing a fair share of contraction.

  • Spiked strips good for us all

    In September 2007, a Louisville man killed himself by driving a Jeep Cherokee into the Old Courthouse in Bardstown. Police had been pursuing Rodney Stewart, 42, for swerving at officers in the median during a roadblock in Mount Washington.

    If the officers had had then what they have now, the incident may have had a less tragic ending.

  • David Hall had great area impact

    Monday was David Hall’s last day on the job as a Certified Local Government preservationist but no one believes Hall will step away from his life work of advocating for preserving the character of Nelson County.

  • Music is a gift to be shared

    Marie Barnes Hubbard died last week at the age of 87. She will be missed by more than her friends and family.

    Until just a few years ago she was organist at Bardstown Baptist Church and provided piano accompaniment to many Bardstown Community Theater musicals.

    As a teacher of piano in public schools as well as a provider of private lessons she instilled the love of music in countless young musicians. While still a student at Bardstown High School she became one of the charter members of the Stephen Foster Music Club, an organization that 73 years later continues to thrive.

  • Our hats off to science winners

    Anyone who has ever been involved in or knows anything about a science fair realizes there are good reasons for students to “do science” rather than just memorize scientific terms and facts. Special recognition goes to a pair of St. Joseph Parish School eighth-graders for their outstanding achievements in science and engineering.Charlie Crume and Brent Howard placed first among 22 teams earlier this month in the middle school engineering division at the Louisville Regional Science Fair.

  • Festival is unique and worthwhile

    It’s hard to adequately describe the art created during “Via Colori.” Comparing it to mere sidewalk chalk drawings is like comparing a finger-painting to the Mona Lisa.We will have an opportunity to see the difference June 21-22, when 50 artists will participate in the Via Colori street-painting festival to benefit the Advocacy and Support Center, a rape crisis and children’s advocacy center serving Nelson County.

  • K.A.R.E. will help farmers recover

    Last year was little fun for Kentucky farmers. As if to add insult to injury, a freezing spell in April was followed by a drought that left many farmers wondering if they were ever going to catch a break.

    Any time the government can legitimately assist agriculture workers, it should. The Kentucky Agricultural Relief Effort (K.A.R.E.) is attempting to do just that.

    The Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy will administer funds from master tobacco settlement money through K.A.R.E.

  • Pickup important for litter abatement

    With the “bulky item pickup” winding down in the county, we are poised for our annual “not-so-bulky pickup” alongside our public roads.

  • Explorer Post a valuable asset

    Giving adolescents a sense of purpose — a goal to work toward — creates success. That’s just what the Bardstown Police Department is trying to do with its Explorer program.