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Editorials

  • Designation helps, but doesn’t solve drug problem

    The designation of Nelson County as a High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area is a dubious event to celebrate.

    It is good that the area will receive more funding from the federal government to help combat the drug problem in the county. It is bad news that we need it.

    As of Oct. 1, Nelson County was added to the Appalachia HIDTA, which covers parts of Tennessee, West Virginia and at least 30 Kentucky counties.

  • Area educators deserve credit for improved KPREP scores

    Results from 2013-14 KPREP testing were recently released and credit is certainly due to area educators.

    KPREP — the Kentucky Performance Rating for Educational Progress — measures several factors used to determine if schools are preparing students for life after graduation.

  • Educate yourself about breast cancer

    Your bra is not giving you breast cancer.

    Your deodorant is not giving you breast cancer.

    Coffee is not giving you breast cancer.

    Mammograms are not giving you breast cancer.

    In a large percentage of cases, your genes aren’t even giving you breast cancer.

    As with anything that escalates to the level of attention breast cancer has received, there are several myths about the disease. There are posts all over social media and even reports on mainstream media that do nothing but incite fear over incorrect information.

  • The Standard holds true to its mission

    As we mark the 74th year of National Newspaper Week, it is important to look not only back, but also ahead at the role our organization plays in the life of our community.

    The Kentucky Standard writes about a lot of subjects, people and organizations, but rarely about itself. During this week of Oct 5-11, please allow us this indulgence to explain how we see ourselves and what we strive to be.

  • Can we talk drug treatment? ‘Obamacare’ Kentucky’s best shot at beating scourge

    Trying to lay out a coherent approach to deal with Kentucky’s plague of drug abuse and addiction without touting the Affordable Care Act is like explaining Keeneland without mentioning horse races.

    You can offer some details and useful recommendations (such as the gorgeous grounds and corned beef sandwiches) while completely missing the big picture.

    Missing the big picture is what Kentucky’s competitors for U.S. Senate are doing as they try to win votes on the drug-abuse issue.

  • Seizing an uncomfortable opportunity

    The video of NFL Pro Ray Rice attacking his now-wife in an elevator outraged many Americans across the nation and rightly so.

    The incident has helped to spark a national conversation about the seriousness of domestic violence and the consequences. The attention, while uncomfortable for most, has been welcomed by victim advocates who hope the incident will finally shift the way our country addresses domestic violence.

  • Seizing an uncomfortable opportunity

    The video of NFL Pro Ray Rice attacking his now-wife in an elevator outraged many Americans across the nation and rightly so.

    The incident has helped to spark a national conversation about the seriousness of domestic violence and the consequences. The attention, while uncomfortable for most, has been welcomed by victim advocates who hope the incident will finally shift the way our country addresses domestic violence.

  • Just the facts

    Conspiracy theories have made for some entertaining movies and engrossing novels, but at least one local candidate for office seems to think they can also serve as a strategy for winning elected office.

    The Kentucky Standard and PLG-TV have become the latest alleged conspirators targeted by Peter Trzop, who is running for Nelson County Judge-Executive in November.

  • Death penalty should be done away with

    In the last Kentucky General Assembly session, Rep. David Floyd, R-Bardstown, sponsored a bill that sought to abolish the death penalty in the state. Sadly, little came out of that session, and the bill went nowhere.

    In a state that aspires to be seen as progressive and that is striving to overcome backwoods stereotypes, the death penalty needs to be done away with.

  • Speeding is a problem, speed humps not the answer

    Speed humps now have their own set of guidelines in Nelson County. Due to a growing number of requests by county residents to install speed humps, the Nelson County magistrates asked County Engineer Jim Lemieux to propose a set of guidelines. Lemieux closely followed what the City of Louisville adopted years ago after the state determined that it should be a local matter, and the court approved the new guidelines last week.