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Today's News

  • RELIGION NOTES: Oct. 13, 2017

    Bardstown United Methodist Church chili lunch
    Bardstown United Methodist Church will have its worship service at its second campus, 5100 Louisville Road, at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 15. A chili lunch will be served after the service.

    Apparations of Our Lady of Fatima 100th anniversary

  • LIVING ON PURPOSE: Choosing to give our stress to God

    It may seem insensitive, but the idea of stress being an issue we can control is worth considering.

    Many within the medical world agree that stress is not a monster that forces us to be afraid, but rather our worries originate as a response from within our own mind. Thus, if we can learn how to re-wire the way we think, we can begin to walk in victory over the stress which we blame for ruining our happiness.

  • Jail logs for Oct. 10-12, 2017

    Leigh Ann Chesser, 33, second-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument.

    Mark Anthony Vittitow, 35, theft by unlawful taking or disposition, non-payment of fines (2016), failure to appear (2016 Marion County).

    Shaun Wayne Vittitoe, 37, non-payment of fines (2017).

    Harold M. Gribbins, 51, contempt of court (2014).

    Johnny Dale Bartley, 46, third-degree burglary, theft by unlawful taking or disposition (both 2017).

    Doris Jean Clark, 47, fourth-degree assault, second-degree wanton endangerment.

  • Bardstown amends city budget

    Bardstown’s city budget must be amended by $40,000 to pay the city’s settlement to Councilwoman Kecia Copeland.

    Last month the council agreed to pay her that amount to avoid a lawsuit against the city over actions against her by the former mayor, John Royalty, and members of his staff under his direction. Her allegations included defamation, violation of her privacy and civil rights, infliction of emotional distress and conspiracy.

    The payment releases the city from any liability.

  • Clark promoted to second-in-command in Sheriff’s office

    The Nelson County Sheriff’s Office has a new second in command.

    Sgt. Mike Clark was promoted to captain last week and will be what Sheriff Ed Mattingly called his “right-hand” in overseeing operations within the department.

    Deputy Ramon Pineiroa, who was previously second in command, was shifted to a team leader’s position in overseeing night patrols, Mattingly said.

  • Former Field of Terror gets a friendly makeover

    In an effort to reach a new audience, an FFA Autumn Fest will serve as this year’s fall activity to raise funds for the Nelson County and Thomas Nelson high school FFA chapters, replacing the long running “Field of Terror.”

    “We wanted to shift our focus to be more educational, and we noticed over the years there were a lot of families that were wanting to come to a farm-type atmosphere,” said agriculture teacher John Hammond. “We decided it would be best to really try to reach that demographic.”

  • Kentucky history stands proud at local home

    A totem pole in Kentucky?

    That might be one’s first thought when seeing the tall, carved ash tree in Ed and Louise Nalley’s front yard on Country Squire Lane.

    Totem poles are part of the culture of indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest, not the woodland tribes of the Bluegrass, but like those in Washington State and British Columbia, theirs tells a story.

    Their story.

  • New survivor wants women to stay strong

    Denise Cecil had two aunts go through breast cancer. One was diagnosed about seven years ago at age 49. Her great aunt died from the disease. Even with the family history, Cecil couldn’t believe what she was hearing when the doctor told her she had stage II breast cancer.

    “I was stunned, you know,” she said. “During all this time when they told me I had to go back to do another mammogram, I was like, ‘Oh, it’s nothing.’ When he called me that morning. I was shocked. I was actually shocked. Unfortunately, it was cancer.”

  • Council approves bonds for potential new distillery

    The Stoli Group, which bought Kentucky Owl Bourbon this year, hasn’t decided where to build its new distillery, but Bardstown is making a play for it.

    After an hour-long meeting Tuesday night, the Bardstown City Council unanimously approved a resolution to enter into an agreement to offer the company industrial revenue bonds in an amount up to $149,750 to build and equip a distillery, bottling plant and warehouses in Bardstown.

  • Glisson resigns from Bloomfield City Council

    Saying that it is “time for me to make room for someone with the time and energy to devote to the job,” Jim Glisson has resigned his position on the Bloomfield City Council.

    Mayor Rhonda Hagan read a letter from Glisson, dated Sept. 14, at Monday’s meeting.

    “It has been a pleasure being a part of the Bloomfield City Council,” Glisson said. “I am proud of all that we have accomplished and I have no doubt the board will continue these successes in the future.”