.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Gulden challenges businesses to support police memorial

    Buddy Gulden of The Mercantile Store on Third Street, is again showing his support for police.

    This time he’s contributing his craftwork and cash to the Nelson County Law Enforcement Memorial that will be in front of the Bardstown Police Department.

    Gulden, a woodworker, donated a liquor cabinet made from a bourbon barrel, which was being auctioned off on Facebook Live Friday.

  • Magistrate questions saving historic house

    County Magistrate Keith Metcalfe has questioned whether an old house on the Wickland property is worth the cost of restoring after arsonists burned it last summer.

    The two-story brick house, built in the 1820s, sits beside Wickland, home of three 19th century governors who were from the same family. The county bought the Wickland property from heirs of the family about 20 years ago for $2 million.

    During Tuesday’s Fiscal Court meeting, County Engineer John Greenwell suggested hiring a professional service company to give an estimate on the work.

  • Travel Channel mentions Bardstown in holiday shopping segment

    An online segment for the Travel Channel lists Bardstown as one of “10 Romantic Small-Town Holiday Shopping Getaways.”

    The feature, set up as a slide show, urges shoppers to forgo the mall and check out towns on the list for their holiday shopping needs. In the section covering Bardstown, the city was painted as a “quaint town” with a “lavishly festooned Court Square.”

  • Applications sought for vacant school board seat

    Community members looking to take a more active role in Nelson County schools will have the chance to do so as applications are being sought to fill an open seat on the Board of Education.

    The Kentucky Commissioner of Education has been tasked with appointing a new board member following the resignation of David Norman, who recently learned he was ineligible to serve because of his work as a county employee in the road department.

  • Jail logs, Dec. 5-7, 2017

    Thomas Leon Cothern, 29, theft by unlawful taking or disposition, receiving stolen property under $10,000 (both 2017).

    James Robert Montgomery, 64, first-degree criminal mischief, receiving stolen property $10,000 or more (both 2017).

    Jacob Kenneth Mattingly, 30, possession of drug paraphernalia, first-degree possession of a controlled substance (meth), possession of marijuana (all 2017), no tail lamps, first-degree possession of a controlled substance (drug unspecified).

  • Captain D’s opens with big first day

    About 11:30 Wednesday morning, the Captain D’s Seafood Kitchen, which had opened an hour before, was encircled by cars, and the lobby was crowded.

    “It’s exceeded our expectations,” Shaun Hill, who owns the new restaurant with his sister, Kelly Boernsen, said of the first day. “We’ve had a least a few hundred, and it’s not even lunch yet.”

  • Lear offers law on renaming roads

    Magistrate Jeff Lear offered the Nelson County Fiscal Court a proposed ordinance Tuesday to allow residents’ input on naming county roads.

    Lear said it would not apply to old sections of Louisville Road (U.S. 31E) that were renamed after the widening and realignment of the highway this summer.

  • Lear offers law on renaming roads

    Magistrate Jeff Lear offered the Nelson County Fiscal Court a proposed ordinance Tuesday to allow residents’ input on naming county roads.

    Lear said it would not apply to old sections of Louisville Road (U.S. 31E) that were renamed after the widening and realignment of the highway this summer.

  • Rock delays storm drain work

    The storm drain system being installed along West Flaget Avenue would probably be finished already if city workers hadn’t struck rock, Bardstown’s civil engineer, Jessica Filiatreau, said Wednesday.

    The street has been closed while workers dig deep trenches to install the 24-inch drain pipes.

    All that day, workers were using trackhoes equipped with jackhammers to pound away at the two-foot thick layer of limestone they hit when digging.

    “It’s slow going,” foreman Carl Lewis said while working Wednesday.

  • Fentanyl infiltration: Potent drug being mixed with more than heroin, adds danger for first responders  

    In addition to addressing a rise in overdose deaths, law enforcement in Nelson County and surrounding areas could be seeing a trend in fentanyl trafficking and an increased risk to first responders, as arrests and indictments on the charge are coming in.