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Health

  • New survivor wants women to stay strong

    Denise Cecil had two aunts go through breast cancer. One was diagnosed about seven years ago at age 49. Her great aunt died from the disease. Even with the family history, Cecil couldn’t believe what she was hearing when the doctor told her she had stage II breast cancer.

    “I was stunned, you know,” she said. “During all this time when they told me I had to go back to do another mammogram, I was like, ‘Oh, it’s nothing.’ When he called me that morning. I was shocked. I was actually shocked. Unfortunately, it was cancer.”

  • A new reality

    Christa Grimes was in the shower when she felt the lump in her left breast.

    “All the fear goes through your head when you find it,” she said.

    At 31, she didn’t expect to be diagnosed with breast cancer, but she was. Life was about to become a whole lot different.

    After finding the lump, Grimes made an appointment with her doctor that same afternoon. At first, they thought it might just be fibroid tissue — she was still young, after all — but they wanted to go ahead and schedule a mammogram.

  • Flaget Health Fair fosters fitness

    Mary Jo Bartley held three big tote bags filled with freebies as she made her way along the covered sidewalk.

    “It’s like trick-or-treating for adults!” she said. “It’s fun. You meet friends and you see old friends and you get lots of good stuff.”

    Bartley was one of the hundreds who attended the sixth annual Flaget Community Health and Wellness Fair, sponsored by the local hospital and its parent company, Kentucky-One Health.

  • Low-cost entertainment exists for seniors

    By Carol Marak

    Entertainment is a priority for me, but spending money on it isn’t. So, I’m on a mission to find low-cost ways to enjoy my free time, be with friends, and socialize. For seniors, it’s important for our health to get out of the house and make connections.

  • HMH Medical Group adds neurologist to team

    Hardin Memorial Health (HMH) officials welcomed one of the newest members of HMH Medical Group, Ryan Owens, M.D., a board certified neurologist, at its Sept. 19 HMH Board of Trustees meeting.

    HMH Chief Medical Officer John Godfrey, M.D. called Owens’ arrival a great addition to the HMH medical staff.  Godfrey said taht with Owens, HMH now has two neurologists on staff to care for patients with any number of neurological conditions including chronic migraines, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, dementia, stroke and more.

  • HMH Medical Group adds neurologist to team

    Hardin Memorial Health (HMH) officials welcomed one of the newest members of HMH Medical Group, Ryan Owens, M.D., a board certified neurologist, at its Sept. 19 HMH Board of Trustees meeting.

    HMH Chief Medical Officer John Godfrey, M.D. called Owens’ arrival a great addition to the HMH medical staff.  Godfrey said taht with Owens, HMH now has two neurologists on staff to care for patients with any number of neurological conditions including chronic migraines, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, dementia, stroke and more.

  • Twice the fight

    When Debbie Paulley first traveled to Louisville for her cancer treatments she was terrified. She walked into a roomful of patients, all at different stages of cancer. She was exposed to what could potentially happen to her and it was scary, she recalls. But an unexpected conversation calmed her.

    About halfway through her treatment, she kept noticing a man dressed in striped pants and a brightly colored shirt interacting with the patients. She asked if he worked there. He didn’t. Then she asked if he was going through treatment.

  • IN HER OWN WORDS: I am blessed

    Gloria Smith, a breast cancer survivor, delivered these comments this summer during a Flaget Cancer Center tour. In observation of October as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, The Kentucky Standard is printing her comments in her own words from that time with her permission.

  • Scheduling a breast cancer screening can help save your life

    Breast Cancer Awareness Month will soon be upon us during the month of October. This is a time dedicated to raising awareness about the disease, which affects about 1 in 8 women in the United States over the course of their lifetime, according to the National Cancer Institute.

    As Breast Cancer Awareness Month approaches, Flaget Memorial Hospital, part of KentuckyOne Health, is encouraging women to learn more about screenings and early detection.

  • Athletic and everyday activities can cause hip labral tears

    By Dr. Mark Duber

    The hips experience a lot of impact due to everyday wear and tear and athletic activities. Issues like trauma, structural problems and repetitive motions can put even more pressure on the hips, causing injuries. One common hip injury, called a hip labral tear, occurs when the labrum is torn.