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Government

  • City Council changes ordinance to allow mobile food vendors at industries

    A food truck is coming to a factory near you.

    The Bardstown City Council on Tuesday gave its final approval to changes to its mobile food vendor ordinance to expand the area where vendors can operate.

    Before, they were allowed only in business zones, but under the changes, they may also operate as approved conditional use or temporary and transitional use in industrial districts.

  • Bardstown government adds city jobs, combines others

    Bardstown’s city government is adding some new jobs in response to the city’s growth, but at the same time, it is combining some top administrative positions to be more efficient and save money.

    At its meeting Tuesday, the City Council held the first reading of amendments to its compensation and classification plan to reflect those changes being made by Mayor Dick Heaton.

    “They’ve taken three, four or five jobs and combined them down to about three,” said Greg Ashworth, who is one of those taking on additional responsibilities.

  • New Haven fails to agree on mayor’s replacement

    The City of New Haven is still without a mayor.

    Jeff Rogers, who announced in June that he was stepping down from the position because of health reasons, submitted his letter of resignation dated July 12, effective immediately.

    The commissioners were expected to vote to replace Rogers at Thursday’s City Commission meeting, but made no decision after a short executive session.

  • Bardstown City clerk, HR director retiring

    Two longtime Bardstown city employees are stepping down.

    City Clerk Barbie Bryant is retiring. Friday was her last day on the job.

    And Larry Green, the city’s human resources director and former assistant city administrator, who has worked for Bardstown for about 40 years, will be retiring as planned, at the end of the month. His last day is July 28.

    Mayor Dick Heaton told The Kentucky Standard of Bryant’s retirement Thursday.

  • ‘False history’

    The mint green metal roof on the house built around 1790 doesn’t comply with the color scheme for Bardstown’s Historic District, but the City Council decided Tuesday to give it time to see what it looks like when it ages.

  • Mayor names committee to select police chief

    Bardstown Mayor Dick Heaton has named an eight-member panel to review applications for the city’s new chief of police.

    He announced its members at the end of the City Council’s meeting Tuesday night.

    The committee is tasked with helping the mayor find a replacement for Chief Steve Uram, who was fired by Heaton July 6.

  • Bardstown City Council briefs from July 11

    Downtown Beach Bash set for July 21

    Live music, face painting and kids’ crafts will be part of the entertainment for the Bardstown Main Street Program’s 2017 Downtown Beach Bash Friday, July 21, from 4 to 10:30 p.m.

    On Tuesday, the Bardstown City Council approved the request presented by Kelsey Lyon, a Main Street employee, to close Flaget Avenue at North Third Street east to Cherry Alley and west to Raspberry Alley so that vendors can set up to sell their wares on the street and clean up afterward.

  • County residents seek water service from Bloomfield

    A group of Nelson County residents who must haul their water and depend on wells and cisterns to supply their families’ needs are hoping that will soon change.

    The property owners on Hagan Road in northeast Nelson County appeared before the Bloomfield City Council on Monday and urged the city leaders to consider extending its water lines to serve their needs.

    That area is outside of the Bloomfield city limits, but Pat Disponett said the city services other residences in the county.

  • McCoy hopes medical review panels are short-lived

    Tort reform long advocated by nursing homes and some other health care providers is now the law in Kentucky, but Bardstown lawyer Chad McCoy thinks it may be on life support.

    McCoy, who represents Nelson County as a Republican member of the state House of Representatives and is married to a physician, said Friday the medical review panels established by the new law will actually increase the number of medical malpractice suits and make them more expensive rather than reduce frivolous claims.

  • Former Bardstown mayor subject of grand jury inquiry

    Former Bardstown Mayor John Royalty is the subject of a grand jury probe, recent court filings and a hearing on Wednesday confirmed.

    Royalty’s attorney, Jason Floyd, is seeking to quash a subpoena a Nelson County grand jury issued to a woman who is in a “serious personal relationship” with the former mayor and also is an employee at Floyd’s law firm, Hubbard, Hubbard & Floyd.