.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Government

  • Nationwide marketing of industrial park to begin soon

    CB Richard Ellis, a national marketing firm, will begin recruiting industry for the Nelson County Industrial Park as soon as the firm receives the contract with the county, which Nelson Fiscal Court authorized Judge Executive Dean Watts to sign at its meeting Tuesday.

    The firm brought Flowers Foods to Bardstown and recently brought Magnum — and 400 jobs — to Shepherdsville, Watts said at the Feb. 15 fiscal court meeting. It has a business relationship with 5,000 companies, Watts said.

  • Johnson swings big as New Haven’s new mayor

    This article is the last in a three-part series highlighting the first month in office of Nelson County’s three new mayors and outlining their first-term goals.

    In the winter months, Bobby Johnson hangs out at Extreme Swing in Bardstown. He works there unpaid, just to have something to do.

    When warmer weather arrives, Johnson stays busy outside, tending to his lawn and rental property, golfing — or attempting to, he said — or just enjoying nature. But this year, he’ll have something else to keep him busy.

  • City shoots down P&Z recommendation on Tullamore zoning

    Bardstown City Council voted Tuesday to deny a Joint City-County Planning Commission recommendation that would have allowed multi-family housing units to be built near the entrance of the Tullamore Estates subdivision.

  • Amendment may exclude county from HB 26

    State Sen. Jimmy Higdon has filed an amendment to remove Nelson County from inclusion in House Bill 26, which would permit the creation of regional wastewater commissions within a six-county area.

    Higdon, who represents five counties in Kentucky’s District 14, including Nelson, said the amendment would not prevent Nelson County from joining a regional commission if it chooses to do so.

  • Floyd continues attaching abortion amendments to bills

    State Rep. David Floyd, R-Bardstown, is under fire again this year for filing proposed amendments to unrelated bills. But in one case, Floyd said the bill and amendment are not entirely different.

    Floyd wants to require an ultrasound to be done and for women to receive face-to-face counseling prior to getting an abortion. One bill onto which he attached the amendment was House Bill 441, which would require the Cabinet for Health and Family Services to create an independent review panel to study child fatalities and near-fatalities that were the result of abuse and neglect.

  • New Haven commissioners consider televising meetings

    The meeting room at New Haven City Hall has had a video camera since the building was renovated about seven years ago, and now the city board of commissioners is trying to decide how to use it.

    Mayor Bobby Johnson said at Thursday’s meeting he had been approached by some New Haven residents who didn’t want the meetings to be televised on local Channel 4 because they thought it would keep people from attending the meeting in person.

  • After smooth transition, Sheckles aims to improve services

    This article is the second in a three-part series highlighting the first month in office of Nelson County’s three new mayors and outlining their first-term goals. Next Friday, we will interview New Haven Mayor Bobby Johnson.

    Shortly after Bill Sheckles began his term as Bardstown mayor, Assistant City Administrator Larry Green was surprised to hear an unfamiliar voice making thorough use of city hall’s telephone paging system.

    “At first, we didn’t know who it was,” Green said.

  • County considers national firm for Industrial Park

    Nelson County Fiscal Court, along with the Bardstown Industrial Development Corporation and the Nelson County Economic Development Agency, is contracting with a national marketing firm to attract business to the county’s Industrial Park.

    CB Richard Ellis brought Flowers Foods to Bardstown and recently brought Magnum — and 400 jobs — to Shepherdsville, Watts said. The firm has business relationships with 5,000 companies, Nelson County Judge Executive Dean Watts said.

  • Old library may have new county tenants

    Although there are still a lot of wrinkles to iron out, the county equipment and grounds committee discussed Tuesday the possibility of moving the planning and zoning and code enforcement offices to the top floor of the former library location on Court Square.

  • Some Nelson County, state roads set for resurfacing and spot improvements

    Several county and state roads in Nelson County are slated for resurfacing or spot improvements.

    Patty Dunaway, chief engineer for Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s District 4, attended the Nelson County Fiscal Court meeting Tuesday to present the cabinet’s recommendation for which state routes should get some attention. Fiscal court has the final say, and it approved Dunaway’s list.