• UK Forestry webinar series kicks off Oct. 20

    University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service will offer a forestry webinar series on select evenings from Oct. 20 through Dec. 1. The series is designed primarily for woodland owners, but anyone interested in woodland, timber and wildlife topics is welcome to participate.

  • Are you nuts? Squirrels are busy this year

    The odd thing about living in the country is that squirrels are rarely the nuisance they can be to urban folk.  I think country squirrels are wilder than city ones, but it also turns out that we are likely experiencing two different squirrel species altogether.  

  • Beekeeper talks about hive care, operation through the season

    Doug Brink has been keeping bees for about three years now and it’s a hobby that started because of his love of honey.

    “We probably use a quart of honey a month,” he said.

    With six hives at his Bardstown Home on Caney Fork Road, Brink — President of the Nelson County Beekeepers — said a lot to beekeeping is observation.

    Recently, Brink performed routine hive checks, looking for any issues in the hive that could be detrimental for the upcoming winter.

  • Take care of trees before winter

    Autumn is when you prepare your yard for spring, but don’t forget to take care of your trees too, say landscapers.
    Chris Medley of Mamma’s Touch Nursery near the Washington-Nelson County line, said trees need to be mulched and fertilized before winter. He uses a Triple 10 fertilizer and a device similar to a post-hole digger to put the chemicals deeper into the ground in four or five places around the tree.
    Then, he said, it’s time to put down the mulch.

  • Fall is the time to prepare for a healthy spring lawn

    How well your lawn looks next spring depends on how well you take care of it this fall.
    Local landscapers say fall is the time to feed your grass and see that it gets enough air and water to make sure it is healthy and beautiful when the grass starts to grow again after winter’s rest.
    Patricia Hines, owner of TLC Landscaping and Nursery Inc. in Bardstown, said homeowners should “power seed” their lawns in the fall, which puts seed into the lawn to make the grass thicker and fuller.

  • It’s 4-H Week for Nelson County youth

    Students in Nelson County are on fall break this week, but for many of those involved in 4-H,  it will be a week of learning.

    Oct. 4-10 is National 4-H Week, an annual celebration of the country’s biggest youth program,  always held during the first full week of October.

    During the week, Nelson County 4-H will showcase what 4-H offers young people and highlight the local 4-H  youth and what they do to make a positive impact on their community.

  • Persimmons dropping early this year

    The apple orchard has been picked clean. Some are stowed in the refrigerator, some are applesauce, some are frozen, and the rest are dried and sitting patiently on the shelf until the dead of winter. (We are not allowed to eat them until all the fresh ones are eaten!)

  • Short days, cool nights initiate bloom for holiday cacti

    Short days, cool nights initiate bloom for holiday cacti

    When attempting to grow tropical plants, we are met with the challenge of mimicking their native habitat, which is difficult inside our homes; we can allow Mother Nature to take care of some of this, outside, for now. Move some of your orchids, holiday cacti and clivia outdoors for the remainder of the season because we can initiate bloom by naturally managing day length and nighttime temperatures.

  • Spiders and their webs signal autumn

    I’m not frightened by spiders. This doesn’t mean that I want them crawling on me.

    I enjoy seeing them in the garden this time of the year. They seem to be everywhere: between the chair and the umbrella, in the frame of the garage door, across the window frame in the office, and across the path through Daddy’s Japanese garden. This last one sometimes elicits panic because I have a tendency to forget about it at night and end up walking through it on the way to close up the chickens for the night.

  • Why won’t my peonies bloom?

    May is the month of peonies, so why am I writing about them now? Well, October is the ideal time to plant, replant, move or divide your peonies. Whatever the case may be, you want to do it now so that the roots can re-establish themselves before the ground freezes.