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Agriculture

  • FFA NEWS: Annual FFA Camp provides fun and leadership development

    Ashley Hardin

    TNHS FFA Chapter Reporter

    One of the many joys of FFA is the ability to attend FFA Camp, otherwise known as Kentucky FFA Leadership Training Center, located in Hardinsburg.

  • Bloomin’ Aussies

    Australia is a world apart from Kentucky, but when some agriculture students from the land down under visited farm families in Nelson County, they found they had more in common with their hosts than language and an affinity for blue jeans and bourbon.

    Twenty undergraduates from Charles Sturt University in New South Wales arrived at Grandview Farm on Springfield Road June 30, just in time for a pre-Fourth of July American luncheon of hamburgers and lemonade.

  • Curing onions, garlic and potatoes for storage

    My tops are beginning to flop!

    On my onions, that is. So it is getting close to the harvest. In fact, just about all of my storage crops are about ready. Potatoes, garlic and onions — these three vegetables are staples worldwide partly because of their versatility and partly because of their storage-ability.

  • Older French hydrangeas bloom best on old wood

    It seems that we have been spoiled. A decade of mostly mild winters has led us to believe that all those border line hardy plants would never get knocked back by a cold winter.

    Well, I have seen quite a few crape myrtles, figs and French hydrangeas that are struggling to come back on old wood. Fear not, however, because these plants are root hardy and will sprout new growth from the roots.

  • Older French hydrangeas bloom best on old wood

    It seems that we have been spoiled. A decade of mostly mild winters has led us to believe that all those border line hardy plants would never get knocked back by a cold winter.

    Well, I have seen quite a few crape myrtles, figs and French hydrangeas that are struggling to come back on old wood. Fear not, however, because these plants are root hardy and will sprout new growth from the roots.

  • Carpenter bees have broken down the door

    Every year about this time, I write about carpenter bees. We live in a wood house, and they love us. And this year, they have really pushed the limit of reasonable bee behavior.

  • Some plants prefer to grown in wet locations

    There are some plants that demand good drainage: taxus, coreopsis, gaillardia and penstemon, to name a few. I have lost them all because they were poorly sited in the garden, but now that I know where water is slow to drain, I know where to plant those trees, shrubs and perennials that like wet environments. There is an up side to poor drainage for some plants, just be sure water is available when Mother Nature doesn’t deliver.

  • Sweet potatoes yield a bumper crop

    We are still eating from a fantastic harvest of sweet potatoes last fall.

    I planted out about 25 organic slips purchased from Country Corner Greenhouse in Shepherdsville in late May and by early November we had four nursery crates full of one of nature’s perfect foods!

    Seven months and counting in storage with no spoilage is impressive. We are down to about six sweet potatoes; just in time for a transition to other summer vegetables.

  • Farmers in Bardstown service center can sign-up for LIP

    The Bardstown Farm Service Agency, serving Nelson and Bullitt counties, is taking sign-ups for the Livestock Indemnity Program to eligible producers who suffered losses beginning Oct. 1, 2011, and subsequent years.

    LIP provides compensation to eligible livestock producers who have suffered livestock death losses in excess of normal mortality due to adverse weather and attacks by animals reintroduced into the wild by the federal government or protected by federal law, including wolves and avian predators.

  • Bloomfield Farmers Market gets off to good, soggy start

    Rachel Young and her ag teacher, Mike Glass, held umbrellas over Brad Rogers’ head as he selected some impatiens and paid for them as the rain poured on the flowers, sellers and customers.

    The Chaplin resident was soaked, but smiling as he made his way through the muddy parking lot to his vehicle on the opening day of the Bloomfield Farmers Market.