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Religion

  • An idea on how to fix Christmas and restore peace on Earth

    Last week, I met a man who told me how his community thumbed their noses at the anti-Christmasness of their annual holiday show.

    Some had decided they couldn’t sing “We Wish You a Merry Christmas” in a public gathering, so they rewrote the words.

    Ha ha ha, the man said. As the chorus on stage sang, “We wish you a happy holiday,” the audience sang even louder, “We wish you a MERRY CHRISTMAS!”

  • Knowing where I’m going is a great deal like remembering from where I came

    As I write this I’m sitting poolside at a hotel somewhere in Southern California, Simi Valley to be exact.

    It rained last night and this morning the sky’s blue and the air’s crisp. The slight breeze makes me glad I brought a jacket.

    I spent all day yesterday with most of my family at my sister’s house. It was crowded and noisy and messy. We ate carne asada and seven-layer dip and lots of fresh guacamole, salsa and chips and watched football. My brother-in-law is a huge Dallas Cowboys fan.

  • Will you accept the challenge to serve Christ, others?

    By Becky Riggs, Faith Worship Center

    During this past week, I was faced with a few challenges. Doesn’t life seem to present a number of challenges? In looking up the word “challenge,” I formed the following conclusion: A challenge is a test or trial that requires courage and bravery to accomplish. In fact, a challenge is an opportunity awaiting you.

  • Caldwell receives Campbellsville University’s Racial Reconciliation Award

    Rev. Michael Caldwell is the 2010 recipient of Campbellsville University’s Racial Reconciliation Award

    The Campbellsville University 2010 Racial Reconciliation Award was presented to the Rev. Michael Caldwell at the annual celebration of the university’s Dialogue on Race by John Chowning, CU vice president for church and external relations and executive assistant to the president.

  • Law, disorder and the nature of humans

    I am a recovering helicopter parent, having spent countless hours and uber amounts of energy hovering over my kids, trying to turn them into mini versions of myself.

    Unfortunately, or maybe fortunately, neither daughter is exactly like me, although they have both inherited the need for a “Do not touch” linen closet — shelves of carefully arranged towels and linens that are not to be touched. Ever.

  • Religion Notes: Nov. 19, 2010

    Contemplative Prayer Day

    November’s monthly Contemplative Prayer Day is 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Nov. 20, at St. Catharine Motherhouse on U.S. 150. Focus of the day will be on Centering Prayer and a presentation on the Mystic: Pierre Teilhard de Chardin and His Mystical Prayer by Sr. Marina Gibbons. Bring a bag lunch. Drinks will be provided. Cost: Donation. No registration necessary. Questions or information, call Sr. Mary Otho Ballard, OP, at  859-284-5201 or maryothoop@att.net.

     

  • Thanksgiving is the time to practice an attitude of gratitude

    As some of you may know, Thanksgiving dinner is my favorite meal of the year. I love turkey and dressing, sweet potato casserole, fresh baked bread and pumpkin pie. I can smell my grandmother’s kitchen as I think about it all. Most of you also know it would not hurt me to miss this meal, but I hope I don’t have to.

  • The mindset of a conqueror allows you to believe you are victorious in Christ
  • Don't let the 'Dog Days of Summer' bite you

    Perhaps you have heard the term “dog days of summer.” Most know that the “dog days of summer” occur during the hottest and muggiest part of the season. Webster defines “dog days” as: 1) the period between July and early September when the hot sultry weather of summer usually occurs in the northern hemisphere. 2) a period of stagnation or inactivity (I found this definition to be very interesting).

  • Losing to win is a strange concept

    I work with a bunch of losers.

    Currently, they’re vying for the title of the Biggest Loser. Based on the reality TV show, The Biggest Loser, some of my co-workers decided to form teams and challenge each other to see who can lose the most weight (percentage, not total pounds) in eight weeks.

    They paid $5 per person to enter the challenge and agreed to weigh-in weekly. The team that loses the least or any team that gains weight has to pay a $2 fine. At the end of the eight weeks the winners get all the money in the pot.