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People and Places

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: Drink up!

    While Nelson County is the home of several distilleries and serves as host for the Kentucky Bourbon Festival, the county also has facilities that produce lighter alcoholic drinks.

    The Springhill Winery began in 1990 in Springfield by Eddie O’Daniel. O’Daniel’s winery has been in other locations in the past 25 years, including Bardstown and Carrollton before settling on the current location on Springfield Road outside of Bloomfield.

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: Working the door

    For some, he is the man who takes your keys and waves you through the metal detector. But for others, Deputy LeRoy Clark is more than a court security guard. He is a friendly face on good days and bad.

    “I get to meet a lot of people, and I try to have something positive to say to everyone,” Clark said. “It may be the only friendly face they see that day.”

    For the past 10 years, Clark has been working security at the Nelson County Justice Center, and as a bailiff in Drug Court.

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: Thrills and trials on the Appalachian Trail

    Blame it on Grandma Gatewood.

    Evy Schnee got the idea of hiking the 2,100-mile Appalachian Trail more than 30 years ago when she met a fellow hiker who had done it. But her boss (she was a bookkeeper for a grocery chain) would not let her take the time off from work, so she put it off until she retired and moved to Kentucky in 2008.

    Her son sent her Ben Montgomery’s biography of Emma Rowena Gatewood, who in 1955, at the age of 67, told her children she was going for a walk, and didn’t return for a long time.

  • Education, utilities biggest changes during early 1900s

    In celebration of the 115th anniversary of The Kentucky Standard, the editorial staff will publish a series of articles that will illustrate the top stories the newspaper covered over the past 15 decades. These series of articles will coincide with a series running on PLG-TV 13 from Dec. 2 to 16 starring local historian and former Bardstown mayor Dixie Hibbs. This article covers the top stories of 1900s and 1910s.

    1900s

    The Kentucky Standard’s origin

  • Local parish celebrates 30 years with ‘twin’ Haitian church

    When the word “twin” comes to mind, people may think of an identical pair of siblings or a bed size. But the Basilica of St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral has a different take on the word.

    In 1985, the church took it upon itself to adopt St. Francis Xavier, a church in Acul Samedi, Haiti, as its twin after being visited by an organization called Parish Twinning that promoted “twinning” of churches. Typically, the purpose of “twinning” is to establish a relationship between two churches that will offer both spiritual and financial support.

  • People & Places>>IMPACT: Artist sharing positive message through music

    KACIE GOODE

    kgoode@kystandard.com

    At 18, Stephan Traynor is working to positively influence the youth his community. His tool? Music.

    “Ever since I was a kid, my mom played a lot of music … all kinds of stuff,” Traynor said. And he loved rap and hip-hop, but there was a negative stigma that went along with a lot of hip-hop songs played over the radio. “I was always kind of shielded from that growing up.”

  • Veterans Day 2015

    Veterans Day celebrations and remembrances were held across the county Wednesday. Here a few photos of how the community honored those who have served.

  • Nelson County teacher uses China experience to help local students

    One Bardstown Elementary School educator is using his experience in China to help students in Bardstown.

    Lance Blanford, a teacher at the school, went to the country for two months on behalf of Campbellsville University to help transition prospective Chinese college students to the culture of the United States.

    He taught the students about American food, entertainment, transportation and government.

    “Just the overall way of life,” he said.

  • ‘The Private’ to bring unique story of war and patriotism to the screen

    Following the success of his film “The Old Winter,” John A. Coulter and his crew are in full production with Civil War drama, “The Private.”

    “In my experience, the first day, the first weekend, you officially start filming, there’s not that much exciting about it,” Coulter said.

    “Something about this weekend was different.”

  • Bluegrass Bigfoot: Do you believe?

    About 50 people turned out Wednesday night for a presentation by Charlie Raymond, founder and lead investigator of the Kentucky Bigfoot Research Organization.

    His audience at the New Haven branch of the Nelson County Public Library consisted of a few skeptics, some believers and those “open to the possibility” as he led a discussion on Bigfoot’s existence.