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People and Places

  • In honor of our veterans

    The Poplar Flat Cemetery rests on a remote bluff overlooking a wide valley, a bucolic, peaceful setting at the end of a rustic farm road that marks the site of one of the oldest, most historic churches and cemeteries in Nelson County.

  • Building a life from clay, wood, & paint

    On their way back to Berea from Cave City, Jim and Jeannette Cantrell were feeling discouraged. They had picked a few likely cities off the map — places Jim could finally set up a full-time pottery and painting studio. But they hadn’t liked Cave City at all, and didn’t much like Elizabethtown, either.

    “We were heading back on the Blue Grass and Jim saw a sign that said, ‘Visit Historic Bardstown,’” Jeannette recalled. Almost on a whim, they turned off the road.

  • Gospel Explosion

    The streets surrounding Nelson County High school were filled April 29-30 for the Baptist Women’s Missionary Convention’s annual Youth March for Christ. Hundreds of people came out for the events, which included a Gospel Explosion Friday night consisting of several churches throughout Kentucky featuring the youth of the congregations in song, dance and spiritual expression.

    The Youth March for Christ started in 1968 with the Baptist Women’s Missionary Convention Young Peoples Department in the East Region of Kentucky.

  • New baby welcomed at place where ‘every day is Mother’s Day’

    Mother’s Day begins with babies, and at Flaget Memorial Hospital Friday, Craig and Sarah Geoghegan of Bardstown were celebrating a new beginning with Dylan Thomas, their second son, who arrived Wednesday at 8 pounds, 8 ounces.

    “I feel very blessed,” Sarah said. There were no complications during Dylan’s delivery, and he is a healthy baby boy.

    As for big brother Cameron, 2, “He’s excited. He always wants to hold him when he comes in,” Sarah said.

  • Photos: Rabbit ears and egg hunts
  • Couple turns tobacco farm into berry farm into winery

    Chuck Hall has always been a player, his wife, Ladonna, said, but not in the manner you usually think of when you hear a man described that way. He experiments with different foods and flavors to develop something uniquely his.

    “I like to play mad scientist,” Chuck said.

  • SCN communications specialist connects east to west

    Planes, trains…and rickshaw? They were just some of the means of transportation for Spalding Hurst as he traveled to India with the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth in January.

    But taking days to get from one place to another, Hurst depended on his guide, Sister Maline Manjoly, SCN, to take him on this journey throughout the India countryside to learn first hand about their ministry work and to assist in the technology of the connection in the global SCN community, and record the stories of the Sisters in India.

  • At the crossroads of history

    April 12 marks the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the American Civil War, a bloody five-year struggle that took the lives of some 625,000 on both the Union and Confederate sides, more than 2 percent of our young country’s population at the time. To this date, no other armed conflict in United States history has proven more costly in terms of lives lost.

  • One local couple talks up the reasons for colon cancer screenings

    What’s the best way to prevent lung cancer? Stop smoking. What’s the best way to prevent colon cancer? Just get tested.

    Colon cancer, also known as colorectal cancer, is one of the most preventable cancers, but you have to catch it early, said Lisa Sosnin, a registered nurse at Bluegrass Community Family Practice in Bardstown.

    Colon cancer awareness is an issue close to Sosnin’s heart. Her father, Jimmie Gardner, died in 1992 of colon cancer. He was 66, and Sosnin is convinced that what may have saved him was an ounce of prevention.

  • City worker shows age is just a number

    Bernice Ruth Brown never imagined that at her age, she’d still be employed. But Brown has been working at Bardstown City Hall since her mid-80s. Now 89, she says she’ll stick with it as long as she’s able.

    “At my age I like to go on and do what I can,” said Brown, who goes by Ruth.