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People and Places

  • (Don’t worry. This is not a real car wreck.)

    “Does this stuff wash out pretty easily?” Bardstown-Nelson County Fire Prevention Inspector Billy Mattingly asked, inspecting a bottle of fake blood.

  • A Lifetime in Politics

    Kathryn Hunter Wycoff was born in Leitchfield in 1911, into a politically-active family, nine years before the 19th amendment to the United States Constitution gave women the right to vote. On Dec. 5, 1933, the 21st amendment overturned the prohibition of alcohol and she took a date to Cincinnati to have a glass of beer.

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: Get your game face on

    Most high school kids dream of the chance to play on Saturdays and Sundays.

    Making the jump to playing in college, where most games are on Saturdays, and the even more astronomical leap of playing in the pros, where most games are Sunday affairs, is the ultimate pie-in-the-sky scenario, reserved for the best of the best.

  • Earning Wings

    Evening sun slips through the window, into the room where four young people in Air Force blues sit at sharp attention. Light stripes the face of their instructor and commander, retired Air Force Maj. Edward Jett, as he draws a circle on the whiteboard at one end of the long room. The circle represents the Earth, and he’s teaching them how to find the North Star.

  • The Family Business

    In 1945, John Newcomb enlisted in the Navy and found himself on a boat bound for The Philippines just two days before The Empire of Japan surrendered to the allied forced. After serving in The Philippines, Okinawa, Hong Kong and Tokyo, he returned home to Nelson County in 1946 and went to work for his father’s business— J.C. Newcomb and Son— as the driver of a fuel tanker.

    His father, John Cyrus Newcomb, was an agent for Gulf Oil and received a commission check for selling and distributing fuel to service stations.

  • Rhapsody in Clay

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    Matthew Gaddie’s spindle whirs into motion, sputtering flecks of light across his clay canvas. His hands ease across the would-be plate, guiding the trimmer across the flattened clay to carve out the underside.

    Gaddie is a clay artist who was recently selected as one of four recipients of the Al Smith Emerging Artist Award from the Kentucky Arts Council.

  • Beauty is in the battle

    Beauty is in the battle. That’s her motto.

    One look at Tammy Cox’s life proves these are not just words she says; these are the words that motivate her, comfort her, coax her out of bed some mornings. They’re words she lives by.

    They’ve inspired her to take pictures of some of the strongest, most beautiful women she said she’s ever placed in front of her camera: cancer patients.

    A cancer survivor herself, Tammy, 43, has seen her share of battles, too.

  • Couple celebrates second year of Boston Farmers Market

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    Boston was once a thriving town in central Kentucky where plantation houses and long stretches of farmland encroached the Victorian homes of local shop owners. Many old houses and buildings still stand from the 1800s and early 1900s, retaining that vintage appeal. Many long-time residents of Boston as well as select newcomers have longed to restore the community to what it once was. 

  • The Coupon Goddess

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    Darby Dugan’s coupon craze started by accident. Three years ago Dugan was shopping when she found an item she wanted for $1. She had a coupon for the same amount. She got the item for free. It started a passion that continues today.

    Since that day, Dugan has clipped thousands of coupons, which has resulted in thousands of dollars in savings. She is a self-proclaimed, “coupon goddess.”

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: Acrobatic Assault

    Vicki Smith has offered gymnastics and agility training to local athletes for more than 30 years, including 27 at the current location of Fit Kids Sportscenter on New Haven Road.

    Smith, who doubles as a physical therapist when she’s not teaching kids, and her stable of instructors have the skill and experience to guide all levels of gymnasts, from beginners to the advanced. In fact, two of them — Karen Stonebraker and Richelle Smith — will be honored as co-coaches of the year for USA Gymnastics in Kentucky in July.