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People and Places

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: Cobweb Corner

    When Shirley Marshall’s husband passed away in 2010, she was left with heartache and an overwhelming collection of items the two had obtained during their 54 years of marriage.

    “When you don’t move for 31 years, you accumulate a lot of stuff,” Marshall said. But when she was on her own, she decided she didn’t need nor want all of those material possessions. She wanted to downsize. 

  • Looking back, and forward

    Every year when the school sports season ends, I find myself with a mountain of photo evidence of all the wild, wacky, thrilling and heartbreaking stuff the local high school athletes have gone through, and never enough space in which to run all of them.

  • Looking back, and forward

    Every year when the school sports season ends, I find myself with a mountain of photo evidence of all the wild, wacky, thrilling and heartbreaking stuff the local high school athletes have gone through, and never enough space in which to run all of them.

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: An artistic passion

    Pedestrians visiting the several stores that line the streets of downtown Bardstown may spot several paintings hanging up in the second story windows of a building at the corner of Third Street and Flaget Avenue, above the Edward Jones office.

    The colorful pieces were created by a variety of students under the direction of Nelson County resident Mary Crum Spalding.

    Spalding said she has been creating art her whole life, but is not quite sure how she got into it.

  • People & Places: Inspired by India

    Kristal Monroe may be back in the states, but a recent trip to India has her eager to help from home.

    “I didn’t know a lot about India when I went,” Monroe said. “It was eye-opening to see how other people live.”

    Monroe made the trip with an Atlanta mission group after being invited by a pastor she had grown up with.

    The group flew into Chennai and then took a six-hour train ride into Tenali, where they would spend the majority of their time for the two-week mission.

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: 'Her last wish'

    Old buildings tell stories in brick, wood and stone, of times gone by, and My Old Kentucky Home State Park is a famous example. With its antebellum mansion, Federal Hill, Judge John Rowan’s little law office on the front lawn, the stables and other outbuildings, it gives visitors a glimpse of what life was like in Kentucky before the Civil War.

    But part of early Kentucky’s story is missing — the physical history of the lives of the slaves and former slaves, including African-American women, who helped build the state.

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: Luck of the draw

    Lucky Bard Games is filled with shelves of various tabletop games, display cases of cards and a collection of desktop computers. But beyond the physical objects is an intangible quality one can only experience after walking through the door: the feeling of camaraderie.

    Daniel Hall, who runs the shop with his mother and younger brother, said the purpose of creating the shop was to bring people who play games together.

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: World on Wheels

    The children knew what to do when they saw the vehicle pull up. As the door opened, they filed inside the tiny space, eyes searching for what they wanted. 

    They had the routine mastered, stepping inside the Nelson County Public Library’s Bookmobile just as generations have done before.

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES: Farming for the future

    On an unusually warm April morning, Amy Coulter waters bok choy while, a few feet away in the same field, her intern, Lindsey Vinson plants cilantro.

    “It’s nice to plant something that smells so good!” the student says as she crouches in the dirt.

    Soon, they’re joined by Amy’s husband, Chris Coulter, whose mother, Gail Coulter, still owns most of the land for Coulter’s Good Earth Farm, a successful experiment in sustainable farming practices.

  • PEOPLE AND PLACES; A whirlwind tour

    Via soccer, Haley Nelson has traveled a lot of miles and seen a lot of sights, but she’ll never forget her most recent foray deep into the heart of futbol’s European hotbed.

    Nelson, a sophomore at Bethlehem High School, recently returned from a nine-day trip to The Netherlands as part of Kentucky Youth Soccer’s U16-17 Olympic Development Program. It’s Nelson’s fifth year in the program and first time being selected to go overseas.